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Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
McDaniel, George William. Preserving the People's History: Traditional Black Material Culture in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Southern Maryland. Ph.D. diss., Duke University, 1979.
Walsh, Lorena S. Charles County, Maryland, 1658-1705: A Study of Chesapeake Social and Political Structure. Ph.D. diss., Michigan State University, 1977.
Dessaint, A. Y. Southern Maryland Yesterday and Today: Crab Pots and Sotweed Fields. Prince Frederick, MD: Calvert County Historical Society, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: Historic photographs and excerpts from 60 of the "best" works on Southern Maryland. Arranged predominately by theme, the chapters include working the land, working the water, life in the home, and life in the community. A ten page introduction gives a brief chronological history of the area.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Earle, Swepson. Praising the Bridge that Brought them Over: One Hundred Years at Indian Head. Indian Head, MD: Naval Ordnance Station, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: The history of the military base, and its surrounding community, as told through photographs and excerpts with interviews from twenty-six individuals. A ten page time line charts events of importance among the Navy at Indian Head, in the town of Indian Head, and national and internationally.
Harte, Thomas J. "Social Origins of the Brandywine Population." Phylon 24 (1963): 369-378.
Annotation / Notes: Harte seeks to establish the eighteenth-century origins of a distinctive mixed race "Brandywine" population in Charles County, though he fails to explain this social identity for the general reader. He points to Maryland laws against miscegenation and cross-racial sexual relationships as indirect evidence that both had occurred in the colony and cites Charles County records for violations of those laws. The article provides less direct support for his contention that Native American ancestry may also have been involved in the mixed race unions. Harte concludes that isolated family groupings in the eighteenth century served as the basis of the identifiable Brandywine population in the county in the nineteenth century.
Lehman, Christopher P. "A Charles County Slaveholder in Minnesota." The Record, 112 (May 2017): 2.