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Wiser, Vivian. "Maryland in the Early Land-Grant College Movement." Agricultural History 36 (1962): 194-199.
Williams, Juan. Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary. New York: Times Books, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Thurgood Marshall was the first African American to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. His rise from a modest upbringing in Baltimore is chronicled in this biography by journalist Juan Williams. Marshall's 1954 victory as the lead attorney in Brown v. Board of Education established his standing as a champion in the Civil Rights movement. Early in his career as a lawyer for the NAACP, Marshall argued the case that led to the desegregation of the University of Maryland.
Williams, Juan. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Banks, Theresa Douglas. The Development of Public Education for the Negro in Prince George's County (1872-1946). M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1948.
Beachy, Clyde. "The Negro Mountain School." Glades Star 5 (March 1983): 474-477.
Beitzell, Edwin W. "Warren Logan, Educator from Milestown to Tuskegee." Chronicles of St. Mary's 32 (September 1984): 185-188.
Blassingame, John W. "'Soul' or Scholarship: An Examination of Black Studies So Far; What Students Learn about History." Smithsonian 1 (1970): 58-64.
Bogen, David Skillen. "The First Integration of the University of Maryland School of Law." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 39-49.
Bradley, Gladyce H. "Friendships among Students in Desegregated Schools." Journal of Negro Education 33 (1964): 90-92.
Brock, W. R. "Race and the American Past: a Revolution in Historiography." History [Great Britain] 52 (1967): 49-59.
Brown, Philip L. A Century of 'Separate But Equal' Education in Anne Arundel County. New York: Vantage Press, 1987.
Clarke, Nina Honemond. History of the Nineteenth-Century Black Churches in Maryland and Washington, D.C. New York: Vantage Press, 1983.
Clarke, Nina Honemond. "Noah Edward Clarke, Crusader for Black Education." Montgomery County Story 23 (May 1980): 1-11.
Clarke, Nina H., and Lillian B. Brown. History of the Black Public Schools of Montgomery County, Maryland 1872-1961. New York: Vantage Press, 1978.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Davids, Robert B. A Comparative Study of White and Negro Education in Maryland. Ph.D. diss., The Johns Hopkins University, 1936.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Earp, Charles A. "The Role of Education in the Maryland Colonization Movement." Maryland Historical Magazine 26 (1941): 365-88.
Fairley, Paul L. Desegregation Activities at Maryland's Historically Black Public Institutions for Undergraduate Higher Education. Ed.D. diss., University of Miami, 1986.
Fletcher, William Joseph. The Contribution of the Faculty of Saint Mary's Seminary to the Solution of Baltimore's San Domingan Negro Problems, 1793-1852. M.A. thesis, The Johns Hopkins University, 1951.
Foner, Philip S. "Address of Frederick Douglass at the Inauguration of Douglass Institute, Baltimore, October 1, 1865." Journal of Negro History 54 (1969): 174-183.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "The Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People, 1864-1870." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 369-404.
Annotation / Notes: In 1864, Baltimore businessmen, lawyers and clergymen formed the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People. Many of these men had been associated with emancipation causes. These men coordinated the flow of money and supplies provided by the Freedmen's Bureau. Eventually, the schools founded by the Association were taken over by the state, which had initially not provided for free, public Negro education at all.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "A Reform Mentality: Federal Policy toward Black Marylanders, 1864-1868." Civil War History 22 (September 1976): 214-35.
Gardner, Bettye. "Ante-bellum Black Education in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Fall 1976): 360-66.
Annotation / Notes: Just before the Civil War, Baltimore had the largest free black population of any city in the country. Most antebellum education of free blacks was provided by the numerous black churches and concerned black and white citizens. Still, free blacks were taxed even though no free public educational facilities were provided for their children. Sunday (Sabbath) schools provided much of the schooling available to free blacks, although a few days schools existed as well, most notably the African School, founded in 1812. By 1859, there were fifteen schools for blacks in Baltimore, all of which were self-supporting, receiving no local or state funding.
Gerdes, M. Reginald. "To Educate and Evangelize: Black Catholic Schools of the Oblate Sisters of Providence (1828-1880)." U.S. Catholic Historian 7, nos. 2-3 (1988): 183-99.