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McDaniel, George W. "Voices from the Past: Black Builders and Their Buildings." In Three Centuries of Maryland Architecture, 79-90. Annapolis, MD: Maryland Historical Trust, 1982.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Maryland Commission on Afro-American History, and Culture. Three Hundred and Fifty Years: A Chronology of the Afro-American in Maryland. Annapolis, MD: The Maryland Commission, on Afro-American History and Culture, 1985.
Menard, Russell R. "From Servants to Slaves: The Transformation of the Chesapeake Labor System." Southern Studies 16 (Winter 1977): 355-90.
Menard, Russell R. "The Maryland Slave Population, 1658 to 1730: A Demographic Profile of Blacks in Four Counties." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 33 (January 1975): 29-54.
Morgan, Edmund S. American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975.
Morgan, Kenneth. "Slave Sales in Colonial Charleston." English Historical Review 113 (September 1998): 905-27.
Murphy, Thomas Richard. 'Negroes of Ours:' Jesuit Slaveholding in Maryland, 1717-1838. Ph.D. diss., University of Connecticut, 1998.
Nevile, Barry, and Edward Jones. "Slavery in Worcester County, Maryland, 1688-1766." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 319-27.
Annotation / Notes: The authors examine slavery in Worcester County, Maryland, before the American Revolution, in order to paint a different picture of slavery than that which is portrayed in popular culture, the large, gang-labor-based institution of the cotton South. Ultimately, the authors set out to identify changing patterns of slaveholding in the county before the Revolution. The increase in the use of slaves corresponded with the decline in the use of indentured servants.
Phillips, Christopher. Freedom's Port: The African American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1997.
Phillips, Christopher William. 'Negroes and Other Slaves:' The African-American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1992.
Phillips, Christopher. "The Roots of Quasi-Freedom: Manumission and Term Slavery in Early National Baltimore." Southern Studies 4 (Spring 1993): 39-66.
Quarles, Benjamin. "'Freedom Fettered:' Blacks in the Constitutional Era in Maryland, 1776-1810 - An Introduction." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 299-304.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines how blacks in Maryland fared during the Constitutional Era, a period when questions of race and color, slavery and freedom, were being raised. For the free black population, there was the question of their status. After the Revolution, Maryland's slave and free black populations became more politically aware of the implications of living in a time of such change. The slogans of freedom and equality used during the Revolution were drawn upon by Maryland's black population in order to attempt to effect change.
Saraceni, Jessica E. "Secret Religion of Slaves." Archaeology 49 (November/December 1996): 21.
Saville, Julie. "Rites and Power: Reflections on Slavery, Freedom and Political Ritual." Slavery and Abolition [Great Britain] 20 (April 1999): 81-102.
Sharrer, George Terry. Slaveholding in Maryland, 1695-1775. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1968.
Starke, Barbara. "A Mini View of the Microenvironment of Slaves and Freed Blacks Living in the Virginia and Maryland Areas from the 17th through the 19th Centuries." Negro History Bulletin 41 (September-October, 1978): 878-80.
Sutherland, Hunter. "Slavery in Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 35 (Winter 1988): 19-27.
Sweig, Donald M. "The Importation of African Slaves to the Potomac River, 1732- 1772." William and Mary Quarterly 42 (October 1985): 507-524.
Thornton, Alvin. Like a Phoenix I'll Rise: An Illustrated History of African Americans in Prince George's County, Maryland, 1696-1996. Virginia Beach, VA: Donning Company, 1997.
Tyson, John S. Life of Elisha Tyson, the Philanthropist, by a Citizen of Baltimore. Baltimore: published by the author, 1825.
Annotation / Notes: Elisha Tyson was a Quaker abolitionist and philanthropist.
Walsh, Lorena S. Charles County, Maryland, 1658-1705: A Study of Chesapeake Social and Political Structure. Ph.D. diss., Michigan State University, 1977.
Walsh, Lorena S. "The Chesapeake Slave Trade: Regional Patterns, African Origins, and Some Implications." William and Mary Quarterly 58 (2001): 139-70.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Rural African Americans in the Constitutional Era in Maryland, 1776-1810." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 327-41.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the changing working conditions and differing experiences of slaves on six Maryland plantations during the Constitutional Era. Tasks varied by plantation, as did the family life of the enslaved population. The author uses correspondence and plantation records to attempt to reconstruct the daily lives of the enslaved on these plantations.
Wax, Darold D. "Black Immigrants: The Slave Trade in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (March 1978): 30-45.