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Dorsey, James. "Faithful Mammy and Family of J. A. Hunter." Harford Historical Bulletin 46 (Autumn 1990): 75-77.
Ferguson, Ann M. "Heritage of Another Riversdale Family." Riverdale Town Crier 26 (March 1997): 3.
Arpee, Marion. "Maryland Slaves in Hardey Wills and Indentures: 1718-1805." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 22 (Winter 1981): 24-27.
Austin, Gwendolyn Hackley. "In Search of the Little Black Guinea Man; A Case Study in Utilizing Harford County and other Maryland Resources to Track Black Family History." Harford Historical Bulletin 36 (Spring 1988): 29-41.
Brooks, Shay. "My Mother's Great Grandfather, Joseph J. Jones, Sr." Calvert Historian 8 (Fall 1993): 24-31.
Callum, Agnes Kane. "Free Blacks of St. Mary's County, Maryland - 1800." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 22 (Spring 1981): 144-46.
Clayton, Ralph. Black Baltimore, 1820-1870. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1988.
Clayton, Ralph. Free Blacks of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1987.
Clayton, Ralph. Slavery, Slaveholding and the Free Black Population of Antebellum Baltimore. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1993.
Cornelison, Alice. "History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 10 (Summer-Fall 1989): 117-19.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Davidson, Thomas E. "Free Blacks in Old Somerset County, 1745-1755." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 151-156.
Annotation / Notes: County court records of Somerset County, Maryland during the eighteenth century are particularly complete, allowing for detailed studies of the county's population during that period. The author contributes to the scholarship which, up until 1985, focused primarily on the origins of black culture on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in the seventeenth century. The author also adds to the growing scholarship on free blacks in this region, which tended to also focus on the seventeenth century. In addition to examining court records to determine the numbers of free Negroes and mulattoes, the author also attempts to determine how members of these populations obtained their free status, that is, through manumission or the as the result of being children of free mothers (free-born).
Davis, A. Vernon. "The Local Scene." Maryland Cracker Barrel 19 (January 1990): 3-5.
Annotation / Notes: Fort Frederick and the Williams Family.
Demissie, E. "A History of Black Farm Operators in Maryland." Agriculture and Human Values 9 (Winter 1992): 22-30.
Diedrich, Maria. Love Across Color Lines: Ottilie Assing and Frederick Douglass. New York: Hill & Wang, 1999.
Diggs, Louis S. In Our Voices: A Folk History in Legacy. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 1998.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Floyd, Bianca. Records and Recollections: Early Black History in Prince George's County. Bladensburg, MD: Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, 1989.
Haley, Alex. "In Search of 'The African.'" American History Illustrated 8 (1974): 21-32.
Harrold, Stanley. "Freeing the Weems Family: A New Look at the Underground Railroad." Civil War History 42 (December 1996): 289-306.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines conventional and scholarly interpretations of underground railroad by looking at the escape of the Weems family from the Chesapeake region of Maryland. By using the Weems family as a case study, the author challenges thirty years' worth of scholarship on the underground railroad. By examining a family that escaped from a border state, the author is able to explore both black self-determination and white assistance found in the records of this family's escape. In addition, the author examines a bi-racial network of non-Garrisonian abolitionists who raised money to purchase the freedom of slaves, or if that was not possible, to channel the money raised into effecting an escape plan.
Harris, Richard E. "Blacks of Maryland's Caroline County Thrive Throughout the Slavery Period." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 8 (Winter 1987): 157-60.
Heinegg, Paul. Free African Americans of Maryland and Delaware: From the Colonial Period to 1810. Baltimore: Clearfield, 2000.
Hurry, Robert J. "An Archeological and Historical Perspective on Benjamin Banneker." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 361-69.
Annotation / Notes: The author provides a survey of the Banneker family farm in southwestern Baltimore County. While most scholarship has focused on Benjamin Banneker's career and achievements as a mathematician, surveyor and astronomer, since the 1970s, scholarship and public funding have helped to illuminate his life as a land-owning farmer. The Bannekers were one of the first African-American families to own land in the Piedmont region of Maryland; Benjamin's father, Robert purchased one hundred acres in 1737.
Ives, Sallie M. "The Formation of a Black Community in Annapolis, 1870-1885." Geographical Perspectives on Maryland's Past." Edited by Robert D. Mitchell and Edward K. Muller, 129-49. College Park, MD: University of Maryland Department of Geography, 1979.
Jacob, Grace Hill. The Negro in Baltimore, 1860-1900. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1945.