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Adams, E. J. "Religion and Freedom: Artifacts Indicate that African Culture Persisted Even in Slavery." Omni 16 (November 1993): 8.
Basalla, Susan Elizabeth. Family Resemblances: Zora Neale Hurston's Anthropological Heritage. Ph.D. diss., Princeton University, 1997.
Baugh, Joyce A. "Justice Thurgood Marshall: Advocate for Gender Justice." Western Journal of Black Studies 20 (Winter 1996): 195-206.
Beckles, Frances N. 20 Black Women: A Profile of Contemporary Black Maryland Women. Baltimore: Gateway Press, Inc., 1978.
Bolling, Carolyn Rae. An Intergenerational Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the African-American Community: An Analysis of the Autobiographies of Olaudah Equiano, Harriet A. Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, and Langston Hughes. Ph.D. diss., Temple University, 1997.
Carson, Warren Jason, Jr. Zora Neale Hurston: The Early Years, 1921-1934. Ph.D. diss., University of South Carolina, 1998.
Cook, Melanie B. "Gloria Richardson: Her Life and Work in SNCC." Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women (1988 Supplement): 51-53.
Diedrich, Maria. Love Across Color Lines: Ottilie Assing and Frederick Douglass. New York: Hill & Wang, 1999.
Diedrich, Maria. "Dr. Lillie M. Jackson: Lifelong Freedom Fighter." Crisis 82 (1975): 297-299.
Driggs, Margaret Barton. "They Called Her Moses: Harriet Tubman." Maryland 13 (Summer 1980): 20-23.
Foeman, Anita K. "Gloria Richardson: Breaking the Mold." Journal of Black Studies 26, no. 5 (1996): 604-15.
Fowler, David Henry. Northern Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage; A Study of Legislation and Public Opinion in the Middle Atlantic States and the States of the Old Northwest. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1963.
Gerdes, M. Reginald. "To Educate and Evangelize: Black Catholic Schools of the Oblate Sisters of Providence (1828-1880)." U.S. Catholic Historian 7, nos. 2-3 (1988): 183-99.
Holland, Marcella. "Emergence of Maryland's African-American Women Attorneys." Maryland Bar Journal 28 (July 1995): 14-19.
Johansen, Mary Carroll. "'Intelligence, Though Overlooked:' Education for Black Women in the Upper South, 1800-1840." Maryland Historical Magazine 93 (Winter 1998): 443-65.
Annotation / Notes: Black and white educators established forty-six schools for free black children in the early nineteenth century. These educators supported education for black women believing that women transmitted knowledge and morals, thus shaping a generation of virtuous citizens. In addition, educators looked to education as a means by which to form self-sufficient and industrious free black communities.
Morgan, Winifred. "Gender-Related Difference in the Slave Narratives of Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass." American Studies 35 (Fall 1994): 73-94.
Morrow, Diane Batts. The Oblate Sisters of Providence: Issues of Black and Female Agency in their Antebellum Experience, 1828-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1996.
Pickett, T. H. "The Friendship of Frederick Douglass with the German Ottilie Assing." Georgia Historical Quarterly 73 (Spring 1989): 88-105.
Terborg-Penn, Rosalyn. "Black Women Freedom Fighters in Early 19th Century Maryland." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Spring 1984): 11-12.
Welcome, Verda F., as told to James M. Abraham. My Life and Times. Englewood, NJ: Henry House Publishers, 1991.
West, Margaret Genevieve. Zora Neale Hurston's Place in American Literary Culture: A Study of the Politics of Race and Gender. Ph.D. diss., Florida State University, 1997.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Chesser, Helen Brown. "St. George Island Memories." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 98-104.
Annotation / Notes: The memories of a woman who grew up on the Island during the early decades of the twentieth century.
Dessaint, A. Y. Southern Maryland Yesterday and Today: Crab Pots and Sotweed Fields. Prince Frederick, MD: Calvert County Historical Society, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: Historic photographs and excerpts from 60 of the "best" works on Southern Maryland. Arranged predominately by theme, the chapters include working the land, working the water, life in the home, and life in the community. A ten page introduction gives a brief chronological history of the area.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.