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Cochran, Matthew D. "Hoodoo's Fire: Interpreting Nineteenth Century African American Material Culture at the Brice House, Annapolis, Maryland." Maryland Archeology 35 (March 1999): 25-33.
Klingelhofer, Eric. "Aspects of Early African-American Material Culture: Artifacts from the Slave Quarters at Garrison Plantation, Maryland." Historical Archaeology 21 (1987): 112-19.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the objects excavated from the slave quarters at Garrison Plantation near Baltimore, Maryland. Various groups of objects represented early black material culture which reveal aspects of Africanisms. Archaeology is particularly useful for the study of Africanisms found in material culture as patterns of found objects may be compared chronologically and geographically.
Blumgart, Pamela James, ed. At the Head of the Bay: A Cultural and Architectural History of Cecil County, Maryland. Elkton, MD: Cecil Historical Trust, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: This beautifully illustrated book presents a history of the development of the county along with a history of its architecture, including house forms, methods of construction, and outbuildings, along with brief write-ups on 700 historic sites.
Comer, Elizabeth Anderson, and Kirsten L. Stevens. "Mount Clare: Introducing Baltimore to Eighteenth Century Splendor." Maryland Archeology 26 (March and September 1990): 86-94.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of Charles Carroll, the Barrister's, Baltimore estate, with special emphasis on the gardens and the archeological work done there during the mid-1980s as a percussor to landscape restoration.
Hopkins, Fred. "Opportunity, Accomplishment, and Betrayal: The Saga of William Claiborne's 17th-Century Settlement in the Upper Chesapeake." In Underwater Archaeology Proceedings from the Society for Historical Archaeology Conference, Edited by John D. Broadwater, 2-5. Richmond, VA: Society for Historical Archaeology, 1991, 2-5.
King, Julia A. "Rural Life in Mid-19th Century St. Mary's County: The Susquehanna Farm at Cedar Point." Chronicle of St. Mary's 38 (Spring 1990): 289-300.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the nineteenth century rural character of St. Mary's County as seen through life at Susquehanna Farm. Two worlds inhabited the farm. The world of the land owner and his family and the world of the slaves who worked the farm.
Kryder-Reid, Elizabeth Bradner. Landscape as Myth: The Contextual Archaeology of an Annapolis Landscape. Ph.D. diss., Brown University, 1991.
McGrain, John W. "Historical Aspects of Lake Roland." Maryland Historical Magazine 74 (September 1979): 253-73.
McGrain, John W. "The Mystery of Historic St. Mary's City." Southern Living 25 (August 1990): 18-19.
Pogue, Dennis J. King's Reach and 17th-Century Plantation Life. Annapolis, MD: Maryland Historical and Cultural Publications, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the archeological digs at King's Reach and what the findings tell of life at the time, focussing on what can be learned of the plantation's physical layout.
Stone, Gary Wheeler. "St. Maries Citty: Corporate Artifact." Maryland Archeology 26 (March and September 1990): 4-18.
Sword, Gerald J. "House Cove Point Lookout State Park." Chronicles of St. Mary's 26 (July 1978): 391-402.
Annotation / Notes: This article compiled all available information on House Cove. It, therefore, serves as a good example of the wide variety of resources that can be found and utilized when researching a Maryland property.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "Seeking Herrington: Settlement in a Very Early Maryland Town." Maryland Archeology 34 (September 1998): 11-17.
Annotation / Notes: Herrington, in southern Anne Arundel, was one of many very small towns in Maryland during the Colonial period. These towns generally had no municipal government. To research such communities scholars must rely on governmental records documenting landowners and residents. After Herrington's demise, shortly after 1700, the area remained predominantly agricultural. This resulted in its location remaining largely intact. Thus, it is a promising archeological site for research.
Gottfried, Michael D. "Fossil Pioneers: The Chesapeake Region and the Early History of Paleontology in North America." Bugeye Times 16 (Fall 1991): 1, 6-7.
Kryder-Reid, E. "The Archaeology of Vision in Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake Gardens." Journal of Garden History 14 (January-March 1994): 42-54.
Ackerman, Eric G. "Economic Means Index: A Measure of Social Status in the Chesapeake, 1690-1815." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 26-36.
Gibb, James G., and Julia A. King. "Gender, Activity Areas, and Homelots in the 17th-Century Chesapeake Region." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 109-131.
Annotation / Notes: Using archaeological records and spatial analysis from three Southern Maryland tobacco plantation sites, the authors provide an ethnographic look at life for seventeenth-century Maryland colonists in terms of gender and class roles. The article provides a brief overview of the economics of the Chesapeake region, the structure of living arrangements, and the gendered nature of tasks. The evidence suggests how gendered and class-based activities contributed to both household production and accrued wealth. The authors conclude that comparisons between the three sites provide the basis for understanding how household wealth was a direct corollary of the ability to secure a large work force and to develop a high degree of specialization.
Shackel, Paul A. "Modern Discipline: Its Historical Context in the Colonial Chesapeake." Historical Archaeology 26 (no. 3, 1992): 73-84.
Annotation / Notes: Shackel analyzes dining ware listed in probate records for Annapolis in the eighteenth century to suggest that during times of economic uncertainty the elite purchased products to differentiate itself from the lower classes, while during stable times there was less distinction. The article provides a brief socioeconomic history of the city at the time before presenting an analysis of the development of meaning systems, values, and etiquette attached to dining items. The author makes the case that this kind of examination provides a basis for understanding "the symbolic uses of material culture."
Sorenson, James Delmer. Folk to National Culture in Nineteenth-Century Montgomery County: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Evidence from a Maryland Piedmont Plantation. Ph.D. diss., American University, 1987.
Beaudry, Mary C. et al. "A Vessel Typology for Early Chesapeake Ceramics: the Potomac Typological System." Historical Archaeology 17 (1983): 18-43.
Cowin, Verna L. "Cannel Coal Pendants: Types and Distribution." North American Archaeologist 20 (no. 3, 1999): 239-262.
Cowin, Verna L. "Once the Metropolis of Maryland: The History and Archaeology of Maryland's First Capital." A Briefe Relation 22 (Spring 2000): 5-6.
Riordan, Timothy B. "The 17th-century Cemetery at St. Mary's City: Mortuary Practices in the Early Chesapeake." Historical Archaeology 31 (1997): 28-40.
Roberts, Daniel G., and David Barrett. "Nightsoil Disposal Practices of the 19th Century and the Origin of Artifacts in Plowzone Proveniences." Historical Archaeology 18 (1984): 108-115.
Shomette, D., and Fred W. Hopkins. "The Search for the Chesapeake Flotilla." American Neptune 43 (1983): 5-19.