Search

1-25 of 607 results
Reale, Robin L. "William F. Douglass, Jr.: Fossil Hunter." Maryland 26 (September/October 1994): 112.
Adams, E. J. "Religion and Freedom: Artifacts Indicate that African Culture Persisted Even in Slavery." Omni 16 (November 1993): 8.
Cochran, Matthew D. "Hoodoo's Fire: Interpreting Nineteenth Century African American Material Culture at the Brice House, Annapolis, Maryland." Maryland Archeology 35 (March 1999): 25-33.
Gervasi, S. "Northampton: Slave Quarters That Have Survived Centuries." American Visions 6 (April 1991): 54-56.
Hurry, Robert J. "An Archeological and Historical Perspective on Benjamin Banneker." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 361-69.
Annotation / Notes: The author provides a survey of the Banneker family farm in southwestern Baltimore County. While most scholarship has focused on Benjamin Banneker's career and achievements as a mathematician, surveyor and astronomer, since the 1970s, scholarship and public funding have helped to illuminate his life as a land-owning farmer. The Bannekers were one of the first African-American families to own land in the Piedmont region of Maryland; Benjamin's father, Robert purchased one hundred acres in 1737.
Klingelhofer, Eric. "Aspects of Early African-American Material Culture: Artifacts from the Slave Quarters at Garrison Plantation, Maryland." Historical Archaeology 21 (1987): 112-19.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the objects excavated from the slave quarters at Garrison Plantation near Baltimore, Maryland. Various groups of objects represented early black material culture which reveal aspects of Africanisms. Archaeology is particularly useful for the study of Africanisms found in material culture as patterns of found objects may be compared chronologically and geographically.
McDaniel, George William. Preserving the People's History: Traditional Black Material Culture in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Southern Maryland. Ph.D. diss., Duke University, 1979.
McGuckian, Eileen. "Black Builders in Montgomery County 1865-1940." Montgomery County Story 35 (February 1992): 189-200.
Mullins, Paul R. "An Archeology of Race and Consumption: African-American Bottled Good Consumption in Annapolis, Maryland, 1850-1930." Maryland Archeology 32 (March 1996): 1-10.
Mullins, Paul R. The Contradictions of Consumption: An Archaeology of African America and Consumer Culture, 1850-1930. Ph.D. diss., University of Massachusetts, 1996.
Mullins, Paul R. "Race and the Genteel Consumer: Class and African-American Consumption, 1850-1930." Historical Archaeology 33, no. 1 (1999): 22-38.
Saraceni, Jessica E. "Secret Religion of Slaves." Archaeology 49 (November/December 1996): 21.
Starke, Barbara. "A Mini View of the Microenvironment of Slaves and Freed Blacks Living in the Virginia and Maryland Areas from the 17th through the 19th Centuries." Negro History Bulletin 41 (September-October, 1978): 878-80.
Yentsch, Anne. "Beads as Silent Witnesses of an African-American Past: Social Identity and the Artifacts of Slavery in Annapolis, Maryland." Kroeber Anthropological Society Papers 79 (1995): 44-60.
Blumgart, Pamela James, ed. At the Head of the Bay: A Cultural and Architectural History of Cecil County, Maryland. Elkton, MD: Cecil Historical Trust, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: This beautifully illustrated book presents a history of the development of the county along with a history of its architecture, including house forms, methods of construction, and outbuildings, along with brief write-ups on 700 historic sites.
Comer, Elizabeth Anderson, and Kirsten L. Stevens. "Mount Clare: Introducing Baltimore to Eighteenth Century Splendor." Maryland Archeology 26 (March and September 1990): 86-94.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of Charles Carroll, the Barrister's, Baltimore estate, with special emphasis on the gardens and the archeological work done there during the mid-1980s as a percussor to landscape restoration.
Hopkins, Fred. "Opportunity, Accomplishment, and Betrayal: The Saga of William Claiborne's 17th-Century Settlement in the Upper Chesapeake." In Underwater Archaeology Proceedings from the Society for Historical Archaeology Conference, Edited by John D. Broadwater, 2-5. Richmond, VA: Society for Historical Archaeology, 1991, 2-5.
King, Julia A. "Rural Life in Mid-19th Century St. Mary's County: The Susquehanna Farm at Cedar Point." Chronicle of St. Mary's 38 (Spring 1990): 289-300.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the nineteenth century rural character of St. Mary's County as seen through life at Susquehanna Farm. Two worlds inhabited the farm. The world of the land owner and his family and the world of the slaves who worked the farm.
Kryder-Reid, Elizabeth Bradner. Landscape as Myth: The Contextual Archaeology of an Annapolis Landscape. Ph.D. diss., Brown University, 1991.
McGrain, John W. "Historical Aspects of Lake Roland." Maryland Historical Magazine 74 (September 1979): 253-73.
McGrain, John W. "The Mystery of Historic St. Mary's City." Southern Living 25 (August 1990): 18-19.
Pogue, Dennis J. King's Reach and 17th-Century Plantation Life. Annapolis, MD: Maryland Historical and Cultural Publications, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the archeological digs at King's Reach and what the findings tell of life at the time, focussing on what can be learned of the plantation's physical layout.
Stone, Gary Wheeler. "St. Maries Citty: Corporate Artifact." Maryland Archeology 26 (March and September 1990): 4-18.
Sword, Gerald J. "House Cove Point Lookout State Park." Chronicles of St. Mary's 26 (July 1978): 391-402.
Annotation / Notes: This article compiled all available information on House Cove. It, therefore, serves as a good example of the wide variety of resources that can be found and utilized when researching a Maryland property.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "Seeking Herrington: Settlement in a Very Early Maryland Town." Maryland Archeology 34 (September 1998): 11-17.
Annotation / Notes: Herrington, in southern Anne Arundel, was one of many very small towns in Maryland during the Colonial period. These towns generally had no municipal government. To research such communities scholars must rely on governmental records documenting landowners and residents. After Herrington's demise, shortly after 1700, the area remained predominantly agricultural. This resulted in its location remaining largely intact. Thus, it is a promising archeological site for research.