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McGrain, John W. From Pig Iron to Cotton Duck: A History of Manuracturing Villages in Baltimore County, Vol. 1. Towson, MD: Baltimore County Public Library, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The ironworks, paper mills, and stockyards of Baltimore County, documented and illustrated by a man who has been called a "walking archive." An industrious and indefatigable researcher, and an estimable writer, McGrain, the Baltimore County historian, has made this territory his own.
McGrain, John. Gristmills of Baltimore County. Towson, MD: Baltimore County Public Library, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: Illustrated.
Marzio, Peter. "Carpentry in the Southern Colonies during the Eighteenth Century with Emphasis on Maryland and Virginia." Winterthur Portfolio 7 (1972): 229-250.
Ware, Donna M. Green Glades & Sooty Gob Piles: The Maryland Coal Region's Industrial and Architectural Past. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical and Cultural Publications, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Some 6,000 bridges, iron furnaces, log schoolhouses, company offices and stores, miner's houses, mill buildings, banks, churches, mansions, inns, resort cottages, and other structures associated with the extractive, manufacturing, and transportation industries of Garrett and western Allegany counties are surveyed and described here, with photographs, and contributions by Orlando Ridout, V, Geoffey B. Henry, and Mark R. Edwards. The largest project to date conducted by the Maryland Historical Trust is essential to an understanding of the unique remains of Maryland's historic resort area and coal and iron district.
Bernard, Richard M. "A Portrait of Baltimore in 1800: Economic and Occupational Patterns in an Early American City." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Winter 1974): 341-60.
Annotation / Notes: This study looks at the social structure and physical location of Baltimore's population during its boom period. The author found Baltimore's rich and poor isolated from each other and the middle class decentralized. Many Baltimoreans worked near their home, while this allowed for the intermixing of people of different occupations, it kept different communities isolated from each other.
Blumgart, Pamela James, ed. At the Head of the Bay: A Cultural and Architectural History of Cecil County, Maryland. Elkton, MD: Cecil Historical Trust, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: This beautifully illustrated book presents a history of the development of the county along with a history of its architecture, including house forms, methods of construction, and outbuildings, along with brief write-ups on 700 historic sites.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Carr, Lois Green. "The Metropolis of Maryland': A Comment on Town Development Along the Tobacco Coast." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Summer 1974): 124-45.
Annotation / Notes: Many towns in the Chesapeake area failed during the seventeenth century. Towns were not needed as commercial centers for the tobacco trade, the major economy of the area at that time. Carr uses St. Mary's City as an example of such a failure.
Cramm, Joetta. Historic Ellicott City: A Walking Tour. First edition. Sykesville, MD: Greenberg Publishing, Co., 1990; second edition. Woodbine, MD: K&D, Ltd., 1996.
Dombrowski, Esther. "The Homefront: Harford County During World War II, Part I." Harford Historical Bulletin 65 (Summer 1995): 107-52; "Part II."Harford Historical Bulletin 66 (Fall 1995): 155-204.
Dürr, William Theodore. The Conscience of A City: A History of the Citizen's Planning and Housing Association and Efforts to Improve Housing for the Poor in Baltimore, Maryland, 1937-1954. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1972.
Friedrichs, Jurgen, and Allen C. Goodman. The Changing Downtown: A Comparative Study of Baltimore and Hamburg. Berlin and New York: W. de Gruyter, 1987.
Annotation / Notes: A multidiscplinary study of the changing economic, social, and cultural role of Baltimore's downtown, many roles have been altered due to the growth of the metropolitan area. Urban downtowns are simply not as important as they once were.
Hahn, H. George, and Carl Behm, III. Towson: A Pictorial History of A Maryland Town. Norfolk, VA: Donning Co., 1977.
Hattery, Thomas H., ed. Western Maryland : A Profile. Foreword by Charles McC. Mathias Jr. Mt. Airy, MD: Lomond Books, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: This work describes the Counties which make up Maryland's Sixth Congressional District. The chapters are written by individuals involved in current affairs. The focus is on politics, government, and the economic nature of the counties. There is a great deal of statistical information. Chapter VIII includes brief essays on the future of Western Maryland by notable Maryland Officials, such as Governor Hughes, the heads of various state agencies, and people of note in the counties.
Hughes, Elizabeth. "A Profile of Chaptico in 1821: The Partition of Philip Key's Real Estate." Chronicles of St. Mary's 43 (Fall 1995): 49-62.
Annotation / Notes: A history of this commercial community as interpreted by the 1821 survey and plat developed for the division of Key's estate.
Males, Carolyn, Carol Barbier Rolnick, and Pam Makowski Goresh. Wish You Were Here!: A Guide to Baltimore City for Natives and Newcomers. Baltimore: Woodholme House Publishers, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore is divided into 21 areas, special emphasis is placed on sites, stores, and restaurants.
Miller, Marcia, and Orlando Ridout V, eds. Architecture in Annapolis: A Field Guide. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical Trust Press, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Detailed architectural histories of over 100 of Annapolis best documented structures. Some histories include historic images, interior photographs, and architectural drawings. Includes a twelve-page history of Annapolis's architecture.