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Andrews, Andrea. "The Baltimore School Building Program, 1870-1900: A Study in Urban Reform." Maryland Historical Magazine 70 (Fall 1975): 260-274.
Craig, Bruce. "Politics in the Pumpkin Patch." Public Historian 12 (Winter 1990): 9-24.
Annotation / Notes: Pipe Creek Farm.
Crooks, James B. "The Baltimore Fire and Baltimore Reform." Maryland Historical Magazine 65 (Spring 1970): 1-17.
Mackintosh, Barry. "'Politics in the Pumpkin Patch': A Response." Public Historian 12 (Spring 1990): 53-56.
Miller, James Edward. "The Dowager of 33rd Street: Memorial Stadium and the Politics of Big-Time Sports in Maryland, 1954-1991." Maryland Historical Magazine 87 (Summer 1992): 187-200.
Brooks, Richard O. New Towns and Communal Values: A Case Study of Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: This work is the product of the consultancy year the author spent with the Rouse Company. He includes a snapshot of residents at the time, such as their population characteristics and their reason for purchasing in Columbia. Included is a chapter on the now gone Antioch College.
Darin, Grace. "The Story of Charles Village: The Building of a Community (1967-1974)." In Charles Village Journal, 6-18. Baltimore: Charles Village Civic Association, 1974.
Dürr, William Theodore. The Conscience of A City: A History of the Citizen's Planning and Housing Association and Efforts to Improve Housing for the Poor in Baltimore, Maryland, 1937-1954. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1972.
Hattery, Thomas H., ed. Western Maryland : A Profile. Foreword by Charles McC. Mathias Jr. Mt. Airy, MD: Lomond Books, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: This work describes the Counties which make up Maryland's Sixth Congressional District. The chapters are written by individuals involved in current affairs. The focus is on politics, government, and the economic nature of the counties. There is a great deal of statistical information. Chapter VIII includes brief essays on the future of Western Maryland by notable Maryland Officials, such as Governor Hughes, the heads of various state agencies, and people of note in the counties.
Hunter, Leslie Gene. "Greenbelt, Maryland: a City on a Hill." Maryland Historical Magazine 63 (1968): 105-136.
Annotation / Notes: Greenbelt, a Depression era, Federally planned community, is a midpoint in community planning, located between the nineteenth century garden city movement and the new towns of the twentieth century. The author, however, does not see Greenbelt as a success.
Kelley, Owen. How Glen Echo Park Joined the National Park Service. Greenbelt, MD: Owen Kelley, 1999.
Marks, Bayly Ellen. "The Tax Assessor's Portrait of a County." History Trails 30 (Autumn-Winter 1995-1996): 1-5.
Annotation / Notes: A study of Baltimore County structures in eight of the County's twelve hundreds, using information gleaned from the 1798 tax assessment. The assessment provides an inventory of structures with exact measurements. Through this early government document it is possible to deduce how people lived.
Milne, Kristin. "Steps in Time: Walking Frederick's Historic Court Square." Frederick Magazine (April 1990): 22-9.
Nast, Leonara Heilig, Laurence N. Krause, and R. C. Monk, eds. Baltimore. A Living Renaissance. Baltimore: Historic Baltimore Society, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: An eclectic mix of over eighty essays, authored by a broad spectrum of individuals, on topics that illustrate the renaissance that Baltimore experienced during the 1960s and 1970s. Organized under such broad topics as "Baltimore Builds","Social Perspective","The Arts", and "What Makes Baltimore Baltimore" the broad range of subjects covered include Baltimore night life, public housing, television and radio, football, aging services, and influential political and community figures. Includes a brief chronology of the City's redevelopment, 1937-1981.
Nichols, Joseph H. Patriots and Pioneers of Howard County, Maryland: The Courthouse and the Jail. Columbia, MD: Howard County Genealogical Society, 1998.
Power, Garrett. "High Society: The Building Height Limitation on Baltimore's Mt. Vernon Place." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Fall 1984): 197-219.
Annotation / Notes: In 1904 Maryland's first zoning law was passed. It disallowed the construction of any non-church building over 70 feet in height within one block of Baltimore's Washington Monument. This act, which was actually a move of selfish interest of the part of developers who were then marketing the Mount Vernon area to Baltimore's aristocracy, ended up being a major reason why twentieth centuries developers were thwarted and the area preserved in its nineteenth century landscape.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. Settlement, Community, and Economy: The Development of Towns in Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, 1660-1775. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Thomas argues that the seventeen clustered settlements that dotted the lower Eastern Shore actually functioned as towns. Although legislatively established they have been largely ignored in the history of the Chesapeake region. Most historians argue that the area was rural, when in fact its character was between urban and rural.
Alvarez, Rafael. "A Long-Lost Jewel of Union Square May Glow Again As A Beacon Hope." In Hometown Boy: The Hoodle Patrol and Other Curiosities of Baltimore. Baltimore: Baltimore Sun, 1999, 176-178.
Annotation / Notes: Enoch Pratt Old Branch #2.
Cox, Richard J. Tracing the History of the Baltimore Structure: A Guide to the Primary and Secondary Sources. Baltimore: Baltimore City Archives and Records Management Office, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: An excellent introduction to building research. It not only discusses what sources to check and where to find them, but also describes the sources, and offer insights into their use. He references other sources and includes several short bibliographies.
Doyle, Francis R. Columbia, Maryland, The Planned Community Between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore Designed to Give A New Town to that Area: A Bibliography. Monticello, IL: Council of Planning Librarians, 1975.
Fishman, Bernard P. "Back to East Baltimore. An Introduction to the New Jewish Heritage Center." Generations (Fall 1986): 10-11.
Arnold, Joseph L. "Suburban Growth and Municipal Annexation in Baltimore, 1745-1918." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (June 1978): 109-28.
Annotation / Notes: The battles between Baltimore City and Baltimore County over the suburban territory spanning a century and a half. This fight was for a larger tax base and the promise of better services providing an important historical perspective on current city-suburban problems.
Ferris, Robert G. Signers of the Constitution: Historic Places Commemorating the Signing of the Constitution. Washington, DC: United States Department of the Interior National Park Service, 1976.