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Bruns, Roger, and William Fraley. "Old Gunny': Abolitionist in a Slave City." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 369-382.
Murray, Pauli. Song in A Weary Throat: An American Pilgrimage. New York: Harper and Row, 1987.
Annotation / Notes: Autobiography of a Black activist from Baltimore.
Preston, Dickson J. Young Frederick Douglass: The Maryland Years. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: There are a number of excellent biographies of Frederick Douglass including works by Eric Foner, William McFeeley and Benjamin Quarles. For the student of Maryland history, Preston's short but well-researched book focuses on the first twenty years of Douglass' life spent in Talbot County and Baltimore City. His experiences as a slave in Maryland shaped his subsequent career and thus are critical to understanding one of the greatest spokesmen for human rights.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. Power and Poverty: Theory and Practice. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Clark, Alex Rees. "Selected Demographic Components of the Non-White Population of Baltimore: A Comment." Middle Atlantic 6 (July 1975): 75-82.
Annotation / Notes: 1960-70.
Clayton, Ralph. Black Baltimore, 1820-1870. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1988.
Clayton, Ralph. Slavery, Slaveholding and the Free Black Population of Antebellum Baltimore. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1993.
Coates, James Roland, Jr. Recreation and Sport in the African-American Community of Baltimore, 1890-1920. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Della, M. Ray, Jr. "An Analysis of Baltimore's Population in the 1850's." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 20-35.
Dudley, David. "James Hubert 'Eubie' Blake." Baltimore 92 (March 1999): 38-39.
Evans, Paul Fairfax. City Life: A Perspective from Baltimore 1968-1978. Columbia, MD: C. H. Fairfax Co., 1981.
Foner, Philip S. "Address of Frederick Douglass at the Inauguration of Douglass Institute, Baltimore, October 1, 1865." Journal of Negro History 54 (1969): 174-183.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "The Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People, 1864-1870." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 369-404.
Annotation / Notes: In 1864, Baltimore businessmen, lawyers and clergymen formed the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People. Many of these men had been associated with emancipation causes. These men coordinated the flow of money and supplies provided by the Freedmen's Bureau. Eventually, the schools founded by the Association were taken over by the state, which had initially not provided for free, public Negro education at all.
Gardner, Bettye. "Ante-bellum Black Education in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Fall 1976): 360-66.
Annotation / Notes: Just before the Civil War, Baltimore had the largest free black population of any city in the country. Most antebellum education of free blacks was provided by the numerous black churches and concerned black and white citizens. Still, free blacks were taxed even though no free public educational facilities were provided for their children. Sunday (Sabbath) schools provided much of the schooling available to free blacks, although a few days schools existed as well, most notably the African School, founded in 1812. By 1859, there were fifteen schools for blacks in Baltimore, all of which were self-supporting, receiving no local or state funding.
Garonzik, Joseph. Urbanization and the Black Population of Baltimore, 1850-1870. Ph.D. diss., State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1974.
Goldin, Claudia Dale. Urban Slavery in the American South 1820-1860: A Quantitative History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Numerous references to Baltimore.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Greene, Suzanne Ellery. "Black Republicans on the Baltimore City Council, 1890-1931." Maryland Historical Magazine 74 (September 1979): 203-22.
Hall, Robert L. "Slave Resistance in Baltimore City and County, 1747-1790." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 305-18.
Jacob, Grace Hill. The Negro in Baltimore, 1860-1900. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1945.
Katz, Sarah. "Rumors of Rebellion: Fear of a Slave Uprising in Post-Nat Turner Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 328-33.
Kimmel, Ross M. "Free Blacks in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Spring 1976): 19-25.
Krefetz, Sharon Perlman. Urban Politics and Public Welfare: Baltimore and San Fransisco. Ph.D. diss., Brandeis University, 1976.