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Paraschos, Janet Nyberg. "Baltimore." American Preservation 3 (July-August 1980): 23-38.
Schalck, Harry G. "Planning Roland Park, 1891-1910." Maryland Historical Magazine 67 (1972): 419-428.
Warren, Marion E., and Warren, Mame. Baltimore When She Was What She Used to Be. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983.
Annotation / Notes: This photo history has minimal captioning, but included amongst the photographs are illustrations of period newspaper articles, from the Sun, and excerpts from books and magazine articles of the eras. There are five essays covering the years from 1900 to 1930. Journals used include Women's Home Companion (1927) and Harpers Weekly (1904).
Althoff, Susanne. "Destination Fells Point." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 26 (July 1996): 70-78, 80-81.
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Neighborhood and City Hall: The Origins of Neighborhood Associations in Baltimore, 1880-1911." Journal of Urban History 6 (November 1979): 3-30.
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Town That Would Not Die; Baltimore: Going Strong at 250." University of Maryland Magazine 7 (Summer/Fall 1979): 2-8.
Arnold, Joseph L. Baltimore's Beginnings: A Guide to 23 Historically Significant Baltimore Communities. Fells Point, MD: Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fells Point, Inc., 1984.
Beirne, D. Randall. "Hampden - Woodberry: The Mill Village in an Urban Setting." Maryland Historical Magazine 77 (Spring 1982): 6-26.
Annotation / Notes: Although this Baltimore neighborhood is no longer a mill town, the area's geographic and social isolation has allowed it, in many ways, to preserve its mill town character. It is a largely homogenous community, predominantly working class.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Beirne, Francis F., and Carleton Jones. Baltimore: A Picture History. 3rd ed., revised. Baltimore: Bodine & Associates, Inc. and Maclay & Associates, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: The first, 1957, edition is probably Maryland's oldest photohistory. Short essays on a variety of subject are illustrated by an assortment of materials.
Berglund, Mark, et al. Patterson Park: Putting the Pieces Together: fall1994 graduate planning studio. [College Park, MD:] University of Maryland, [1994].
Bernard, Richard M. "A Portrait of Baltimore in 1800: Economic and Occupational Patterns in an Early American City." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Winter 1974): 341-60.
Annotation / Notes: This study looks at the social structure and physical location of Baltimore's population during its boom period. The author found Baltimore's rich and poor isolated from each other and the middle class decentralized. Many Baltimoreans worked near their home, while this allowed for the intermixing of people of different occupations, it kept different communities isolated from each other.
Blake, Allison. The Chesapeake Bay Book: A Complete Guide. 3rd edition. Lee, MA: Berkshire House Publishers, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: A well researched tour guide for the general population.
Brain, John. Govans, Village and Suburb: A Picture History of a North Baltimore Community. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 1996.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Brooklyn-Curtis Bay Historical Committee. A History of Brooklyn-Curtis Bay, 1776-1976. Baltimore: The Committee, 1976.
Browne, Gary L. "Urban Centers of the Past." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Fall 1984): 6-7.
Annotation / Notes: A variety of factors effect the rise and fall of urban centers -- transportation, market, environmental, and political changes, as well as the rise of other centers. Browne presents a brief discussion of the fate of approximately ten urban centers.
Carmichael, Thomas. "Buffalo/Baltimore, Athens/Dallas: John Barth, Don DeLillo, and the Cities of Postmodernism." Canadian Review of American Studies 22 (Fall 1991): 241-49.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.
Comer, Elizabeth Anderson, and Kirsten L. Stevens. "Mount Clare: Introducing Baltimore to Eighteenth Century Splendor." Maryland Archeology 26 (March and September 1990): 86-94.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of Charles Carroll, the Barrister's, Baltimore estate, with special emphasis on the gardens and the archeological work done there during the mid-1980s as a percussor to landscape restoration.
Curry, Leonard P. "Urbanization and Urbanism in the Old South: A Comparative View." Journal of Southern History 40 (February 1974): 43-60.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore is included in this author's study of the South's pre-1850 urban centers. Curry argues that these centers are often ignored in historian's views of the Old South even though some of the nation's largest cities were located in that region. Contrary to general view, the South did have urban and commercial centers and had more than a passing interest in manufacturing.
Darin, Grace. "The Story of Charles Village: The Building of a Community (1967-1974)." In Charles Village Journal, 6-18. Baltimore: Charles Village Civic Association, 1974.
De Gast, Robert. "A Jones Falls Adventure." Baltimore 68 (September 1975): 20-25.
Dehler, Katherine B. "Mt. Vernon Place at the Turn of the Century: A Vignette of the Garrett Family." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Fall 1974): 279-92.
Annotation / Notes: The Garretts, Baltimore's grandest family, had a profound influence on the growth of culture and education in Baltimore. They also had a profound influence on their own neighborhood. Stanford White and Tiffany worked on their Mount Vernon Place home.
Delorenzo, Lisa Christine. Neighborhood Stability and Urban Policy: Fortifying the Link. Ph.D. diss., University of Missouri-St. Louis, 1997.