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Guroff, Margaret. "Glenn L. Martin." Baltimore 92 (July 1999): 30-31.
Schneidereith, C. William, Jr. In Tribute to C. William Schneidereith 1886-1976. Baltimore: Schneidereith & Sons, 1977.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore printer.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. Power and Poverty: Theory and Practice. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Garonzik, Joseph. Urbanization and the Black Population of Baltimore, 1850-1870. Ph.D. diss., State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1974.
Goldin, Claudia Dale. Urban Slavery in the American South 1820-1860: A Quantitative History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Numerous references to Baltimore.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Krefetz, Sharon Perlman. Urban Politics and Public Welfare: Baltimore and San Fransisco. Ph.D. diss., Brandeis University, 1976.
May, Patrick Joseph. The Residential Change of the Free Black Population of Baltimore, 1850-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, College Park, 1999.
Orser, W. Edward. "Secondhand Suburbs: Black Pioneers in Baltimore's Edmondson Village, 1955-1980." Urban History 16 (May 1990): 227-62.
Phillips, Christopher William. 'Negroes and Other Slaves:' The African-American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1992.
Phillips, Christopher. "The Roots of Quasi-Freedom: Manumission and Term Slavery in Early National Baltimore." Southern Studies 4 (Spring 1993): 39-66.
Rosenberg, Louis S. The Low-Income Housing Effort in the City of Baltimore. Ph.D. diss., Brandeis University, 1976.
Skotnes, Andor D. The Black Freedom Movement and the Workers' Movement in Baltimore, 1930-1939. Ph.D. diss., Rutgers University, New Brunswick, 1991.
Skotnes, A. "'Buy Where You Can Work:' Boycotting for Jobs in African-American Baltimore, 1933-1934." Journal of Social History 27 (Summer 1994): 735-61.
Thomas, Bettye C. "A Nineteenth Century Black Operated Shipyard, 1866-1884: Reflections Upon Its Inception and Ownership." Journal of Negro History 59 (January 1974): 1-12.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the founding, organization and ownership of a black-owned and operated business of national prominence immediately following the Civil War. The Chesapeake Marine Railway and Dry Dock Company, located Baltimore, was one of the best known of these companies. However, scholars have only noted th existence of this company, and, as of 1974, there were no scholarly studies of this company.
Towers, Frank. "Serena Johnson and Slave Domestic Servants in Antebellum Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 334-37.
West, Herbert Lee, Jr. Urban Life and Spatial Distribution of Blacks in Baltimore, Maryland. Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: 1940-70.
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Neighborhood and City Hall: The Origins of Neighborhood Associations in Baltimore, 1880-1911." Journal of Urban History 6 (November 1979): 3-30.
Beirne, D. Randall. "Hampden - Woodberry: The Mill Village in an Urban Setting." Maryland Historical Magazine 77 (Spring 1982): 6-26.
Annotation / Notes: Although this Baltimore neighborhood is no longer a mill town, the area's geographic and social isolation has allowed it, in many ways, to preserve its mill town character. It is a largely homogenous community, predominantly working class.
Bernard, Richard M. "A Portrait of Baltimore in 1800: Economic and Occupational Patterns in an Early American City." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Winter 1974): 341-60.
Annotation / Notes: This study looks at the social structure and physical location of Baltimore's population during its boom period. The author found Baltimore's rich and poor isolated from each other and the middle class decentralized. Many Baltimoreans worked near their home, while this allowed for the intermixing of people of different occupations, it kept different communities isolated from each other.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Browne, Gary L. "Urban Centers of the Past." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Fall 1984): 6-7.
Annotation / Notes: A variety of factors effect the rise and fall of urban centers -- transportation, market, environmental, and political changes, as well as the rise of other centers. Browne presents a brief discussion of the fate of approximately ten urban centers.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.