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Schaaf, Elizabeth. "George Peabody: His Life and Legacy, 1795-1869." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Fall 1995): 268-85.
Annotation / Notes: George Peabody's legacy to Baltimore transcends the music conservatory and magnificent library that bear his name. His gifts influenced other wealthy friends whose philanthropy help establish some of the great educational and cultural institutions that grace the city: the Johns Hopkins University, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the Walters Art Gallery. This article surveys the life of a man admired and respected on both sides of the Atlantic.
Schaaf, Elizabeth. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Foner, Philip S. "Address of Frederick Douglass at the Inauguration of Douglass Institute, Baltimore, October 1, 1865." Journal of Negro History 54 (1969): 174-183.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "The Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People, 1864-1870." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 369-404.
Annotation / Notes: In 1864, Baltimore businessmen, lawyers and clergymen formed the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People. Many of these men had been associated with emancipation causes. These men coordinated the flow of money and supplies provided by the Freedmen's Bureau. Eventually, the schools founded by the Association were taken over by the state, which had initially not provided for free, public Negro education at all.
Gardner, Bettye. "Ante-bellum Black Education in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Fall 1976): 360-66.
Annotation / Notes: Just before the Civil War, Baltimore had the largest free black population of any city in the country. Most antebellum education of free blacks was provided by the numerous black churches and concerned black and white citizens. Still, free blacks were taxed even though no free public educational facilities were provided for their children. Sunday (Sabbath) schools provided much of the schooling available to free blacks, although a few days schools existed as well, most notably the African School, founded in 1812. By 1859, there were fifteen schools for blacks in Baltimore, all of which were self-supporting, receiving no local or state funding.
Orr, Marion. Black Social Capital: The Politics of School Reform in Baltimore, 1986-1998. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1999.
Palumbos, Robert M. "Student Involvement in the Baltimore Civil Rights Movement, 1953-63." Maryland Historical Magazine 94 (Winter 1999): 448-92.
Thomas, Bettye C. "Public Education and Black Protest in Baltimore, 1865-1900." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Fall 1976): 381-90.
Thomsen, Roszel, C. "The Integration of Baltimore's Polytechnic Institute: A Reminiscence." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (1984): 235-38.
Andrews, Andrea. "The Baltimore School Building Program, 1870-1900: A Study in Urban Reform." Maryland Historical Magazine 70 (Fall 1975): 260-274.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
McConnell, Roland C. The History of Morgan Park: A Baltimore Neighborhood, 1917-1999. Baltimore: Morgan Park Improvement Association, 2000.
McConnell, Roland C. "Mount Washington in Quotations, Part I." History Trails 28 (Autumn 1993-Winter 1994): 1-8; Part II, 28 (Spring-Summer 1994): 9-16.
Annotation / Notes: A compilation of small Mt. Washington articles from a variety of Maryland newspapers.
McConnell, Roland C. Neighborhood Discovery: An Elementary Guide for the Investigation of Local History. Baltimore: Baltimore Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation and Baltimore Public Schools Office of Gifted and Talented Program Services, 1982.
Wolff, Robert S. Racial Imaginings: Schooling and Society and Industrial Baltimore, 1860-1920. Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1997.
Fisher, James Long. The Origin and Development of Public School Music in Baltimore to 1870. Ed.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1970.
Adams, Cheryl, and Art Emerson. Religion Collections in Libraries and Archives: A Guide to Resources in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Washington: Humanities and Social Sciences Division, Library of Congress, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Institutional level descriptions for nineteen Maryland libraries and archives holding significant religious collections. A tremendous level of detail is given. Subject headings are assigned to each institution. This guide is also available online at https://www.loc.gov/rr/main/religion/.
Alvarez, Rafael. "It Was Like a Time Capsule." In Hometown Boy: The Hoodle Patrol and Other Curiosities of Baltimore. Baltimore: Baltimore Sun, 1999, 178-179.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore Hebrew University Library.
Anderson, Patricia Dockman. "Laying the Foundations: Herbert Baxter Adams, John Thomas Scharf, and Early Maryland Historical Scholarship." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Summer 1994): 170-83.
Annotation / Notes: Adams and Scharf were two of Maryland's leading late nineteenth century historians. They, however, represented two very different historical schools. Adams, a Johns Hopkins professor, was instrumental in the professionalization of the history discipline. Scharf was a "chronicler", a local historian. He also had a strong interest in document preservation. Adams played a pivotal role in the donation of Scharf's collection to Hopkins. Scharf's collection is now housed at the Maryland State Archives.
Archives, and Manuscripts. The Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives. The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1980.
Baltimore History Network. Baltimore's Past: A Directory of Historical Sources. Baltimore: Baltimore History Group, 1989.