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Dash, Joan. Summoned to Jerusalem: The Life of Henrietta Szold. New York: Harper and Row, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Henrietta Szold (1860-1945) was a social activist whose career began in Baltimore with the founding of a center and night school for recent immigrants from Russia similar to the settlement houses pioneered by Jane Addams. She later founded Hadassah, the Jewish women's organization, and became a leader in the Zionist movement.
Hom-Kim, Lillian Lee. "Fang H. Der, An Oral History from Baltimore, Maryland." Chinese America: History and Perspectives (1988): 190-98.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "Aaron Aaronsohn; Pioneer Scientist, Spy and Friend of Henrietta Szold." Hadassah Magazine (March 1977): 16-17, 38-42.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. Henrietta Szold: Baltimorean. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1976.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "Israel Zangwill Visits Baltimore." Generations (Fall 1993): 8.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "A Memorial for Two Wealthy Baltimoreans." Generations (Summer 1991): 9.
Olschansky, Al. "Baltimore City in its Heyday: As I Knew it in the 1930s when I was Growing Up." Generations 8 (Spring 1988): 10-12.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Dürr, W. Theodore. "People of the Peninsula." Maryland Historical Magazine 77 (Spring 1982): 27-53.
Annotation / Notes: Dürr presents a hundred year history (1880-1980) of four distinct south Baltimore neighborhoods -- South Baltimore (including Federal Hill), Locust Point, Riverside, and Sharp-Leadenhall. Although distinct neighborhoods they functioned as a cohesive region.
Fee, Elizabeth, et. al. "Baltimore by Bus: Steering a New Course through the City's History." Radical History Review 28-30 (1984): 206-216.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the development of the alternative, left oriented "People's Bus Tour" of Baltimore. The tour's intention was to demonstrate the diversity of Baltimore and to show the conflicts and processes that affected the City's working class. Class relations are interpreted throughout Baltimore's history by visiting significant and visually interesting places.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Liebowitz, Steve. "The End of a Jewish Neighborhood: The Life and Death of Lower Park Heights." Generations (Fall 1998): 4-7.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the move of the Jewish community (the people and their institutions) towards the suburbs. A move brought about, in large part, by racism and the search for greater social status.
Nast, Leonara Heilig, Laurence N. Krause, and R. C. Monk, eds. Baltimore. A Living Renaissance. Baltimore: Historic Baltimore Society, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: An eclectic mix of over eighty essays, authored by a broad spectrum of individuals, on topics that illustrate the renaissance that Baltimore experienced during the 1960s and 1970s. Organized under such broad topics as "Baltimore Builds","Social Perspective","The Arts", and "What Makes Baltimore Baltimore" the broad range of subjects covered include Baltimore night life, public housing, television and radio, football, aging services, and influential political and community figures. Includes a brief chronology of the City's redevelopment, 1937-1981.
Olesker, Michael. Michael Olesker's Baltimore. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: Selection of columns from the News American and Baltimore Sun, covering the years 1979-1994. His topics include politicians, sports, eccentrics. He presents a loving picture of Baltimore during the last quarter of the twentieth century without overlooking the problems, such as crime, drugs, and poverty, which plague the city.
Olson, Sherry H. Baltimore: The Building of an American City. Revised edition. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: The product of a geographer, this excellent history of Baltimore focuses on its physical growth as an urban center. Special emphasis is placed on how the city, and its inhabitants, handled the changes brought about by city growth.
Rich, Linda G., Joan Clark Netherwood, and Elinor B. Cahn. Neighborhood: A State of Mind. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1981.
Annotation / Notes: East Baltimore Documentary Photography Project.
Ryon, Roderick N. Northwest Baltimore and Its Neighborhoods, 1870-1970 Before "Smart Growth". Baltimore: University of Baltimore Press, 2000.
Towers, Frank Harold. Ruffians on the Urban Border: Labor, Politics, and Race in Baltimore, 1850-1861. Ph.D. diss., University of California, Irvine, 1993.
Kares, M. "Baltimore: Center of German-American Organ Building." Tracker 39, no. 3 (1995): 10-17.
Myers, J., and C. Kennedy. "The Last Words: Baltimore Multiculturalism...and furthermore." Sing Out 38 (May/June/July 1993): 134-35.
Ritchey, David. "Baltimore's Eighteenth-Century French Theatre." Southern Speech Communication Journal 38 (1972): 164-167.
Zuker, Adolf E. "The History of the German Theatre in Baltimore." The Germanic Review 18 (1943): 122-35.
Beirne, Francis F. "The Four Merchants." In The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.