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Humphries, Lance Lee. Robert Gilmore, Jr. (1774-1848): Baltimore Collector and American Art Patron. Ph.D. diss., University of Virginia, 1998.
Page, Jean Jepson. "James McNeill Whistler, Baltimorean, and 'The White Girl': A Speculative Essay." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 10-38.
Dilts, James D., and Catharine F. Black, eds. Baltimore's Cast-Iron Buildings and Architectural Ironwork. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1991; reprint, 2000.
Dorsey, John, and James D. Dilts. A Guide to Baltimore Architecture. 1973, 1981; 3rd revised edition. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1997.
Kelly, Jacques. Bygone Baltimore. Norfolk, VA: Donning, 1982.
Annotation / Notes: The real Baltimore in historic photographs selected and annotated by one of the city's most diligent appreciators. The photographs of buildings are excellent and include many interiors.
Dehler, Katherine B. "Mt. Vernon Place at the Turn of the Century: A Vignette of the Garrett Family." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Fall 1974): 279-92.
Annotation / Notes: The Garretts, Baltimore's grandest family, had a profound influence on the growth of culture and education in Baltimore. They also had a profound influence on their own neighborhood. Stanford White and Tiffany worked on their Mount Vernon Place home.
May, Huguette D., and Anthea Smith. Finding the Charm in Charm City: Affectionate Views of Baltimore. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A modern photo documentary, using color Polaris Image Transfers of "charming spots" in Baltimore. These spots may not be considered so charming any place else in the world, but definitely display Baltimore's character. Through these image the authors show buildings, building details, and streetscapes. There is an accompanying text that gives a brief history of neighborhoods, buildings, and roads. A visual documentation of Baltimore in the 1990s.
Power, Garrett. "High Society: The Building Height Limitation on Baltimore's Mt. Vernon Place." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Fall 1984): 197-219.
Annotation / Notes: In 1904 Maryland's first zoning law was passed. It disallowed the construction of any non-church building over 70 feet in height within one block of Baltimore's Washington Monument. This act, which was actually a move of selfish interest of the part of developers who were then marketing the Mount Vernon area to Baltimore's aristocracy, ended up being a major reason why twentieth centuries developers were thwarted and the area preserved in its nineteenth century landscape.
Sarudy, Barbara Wells. "A Late Eighteenth-Century 'Tour' of Baltimore Gardens." Journal of Garden History [Great Britain] 9 (July-September 1989): 125-40.
Dormon, James H. Theater in the Ante Bellum South, 1815-1861. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1967.
Spencer, William B. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, 1965-1982: The Meyerhoff Years. D.M.A. diss., Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, Peabody Conservatory of Music, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Spencer's dissertation examines the remarkable growth of the orchestra during Joseph Meyerhoff's tenure as chairman of the orchestra's board of trustees. Drawing on the orchestra's extensive historical records, oral history interviews and archival documents at Maryland Historical Society, the Peabody Archives and Pratt's Maryland Room, Spencer paints a vibrant portrait of an orchestra in transition and the struggle to build a performance hall. Union negotiations, race-relations, management strategies, and the changing image of the orchestra are reviewed in depth. Spencer enlivens his text with back-stage stories from musicians and former conductors.
Baltimore Museum of Art. :Annual I The Museum: Its First Half Century. Baltimore: The Baltimore Museum of Art, 1966.
Annotation / Notes: A history of the first fifty years of the BMA, from its start as a City-Wide Congress Committee on Founding an Art Museum (1911), to its temporary home in Mount Vernon, to the construction of its permanent home in Wyman Park. A major thesis is that a very modern thinking museum became a great success in a city known for being conservative. Nicely illustrated with works from the collection and photographs of museum activities.
Boles, John B., ed. Maryland Heritage: Five Baltimore Institutions Celebrate the American Revolution. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: This exhibition catalog joins the efforts of five major collecting institutions through a series of essays and illustrations from their respective exhibits.
Carter, Edward C., II. "The Papers of Benjamin Henry Latrobe and the Maryland Historical Society, 1885-1971: Nature, Structure and Means of Acquisition." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 436-455.
Annotation / Notes: An involved discussion of the provenance of the Latrobe collection and the project to microfilm it. Latrobe, a prominent architect, artist, and surveyor, among other talents, left a variety of materials, including drawings depicting America at the end of the eighteenth century. An interesting discussion of the history of a rich collection.
Carter, Edward C., II, Editor in Chief, and Thomas E. Jeffrey, Microfiche Editor. The Guide and Index to the Microfiche Edition of the Papers of Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Clifton, NJ: Published for the Maryland Historical Society by James T. White and Co., 1976.
Carter, Edward C., II, Editor in Chief, and Thomas E. Jeffrey, Microfiche Editor. "Celebrating the Baltimore City Life Collections." MHS/News (April-June 1998): 4-5.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the absorption of the Baltimore City Life Museum's holdings by the Maryland Historical Society. Includes descriptions of important collections and of the exhibit installed to showcase the acquisition.
Corrin, Lisa G., ed. Mining the Museum: An Installation by Fred Wilson. Baltimore: The Contemporary in Cooperation with the New Press, New York, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: This publication documents the landmark Maryland Historical Society and Contemporary exhibit. Included is an interview with the artist and with the docents who worked the exhibit, along with visitor surveys and object checklists.
Cox, Lynn, and Zinkham, Helena. "Picture Research at the Maryland Historical Society: A Guide to the Sources." Maryland Historical Magazine 76 (Spring 1981): 1-21.
Annotation / Notes: Although the collection descriptions are out-dated, this work still serves as a good introduction for newcomers to picture research. It provides a good overview of the wide range of sources which can be used to locate visual resources in a museum and library setting and provides eight basic questions to consider when preparing for a picture research trip.
DiNoto, Andrea. "A Singular Taste." Connoisseur (November 1984).
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the traveling jewelry exhibition -- "Objects of Adornment: Five Thousand Years of Jewelry from the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore". 213 pieces collected by founder Henry Walters were displayed. Nice glossy color illustrations.
Dowell, Susan Stiles. "The Maryland Historical Society." Maryland Magazine (Autumn 1984): 15-20.
Annotation / Notes: A good general history of the Maryland's major private collecting institution written for the general public. Of special interest is an inserted article "In Search of Treasure", by Bonnie Joe Ayers, which explains how museums and special libraries acquire their materials.
Dowell, Susan Stiles. "The Gem of Baltimore Celebrates 75." Southern Living 24 (May 1989): 43.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore Museum of Art.
Gustafson, E. H. "Museum Accessions." Antiques 138 (December 1990): 1174.
Annotation / Notes: Quilts at the Maryland Historical Society.
Harris, Dale. "Collective Genius; The Importance of the Walters Art Gallery." Connoisseur (November 1984).
Annotation / Notes: The Walters Art Gallery, which holds a varied collection, was established when Henry Walters, a wealthy businessmen, left his collection, including his father's collection, to Baltimore. Although a Baltimore native, Henry seldom lived in Baltimore. The collecting habits of both Walters are discussed. A nicely illustrated brief history of an important museum.
Holland, Eugenia Calvert, Romaine Stec Somerville, Stiles Tuttle Colwill, and K. Beverley Whiting Young. Four Generations of Commissions: The Peale Collection of the Maryland Historical Society; March 3, 1975-June 29, 1975. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1975.
Annotation / Notes: This exhibit catalog not only supplies information on each portrait, but also give brief biographical information on each subject. A significant portion of the text is given to a discussion of the eleven Peale family members who were artists.
Holland, Eugenia C., and Louisa M. Gary. "Miniatures in the Collection of the Maryland Historical Society." Maryland Historical Magazine 51 (December 1956): 341-354.