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Aberbach, Moses. Soloman Baroway: Farmer, Writer, Zionist and Early Baltimore Social Worker. Baltimore: Baltimore Jewish Historical Society, 1990.
Dash, Joan. Summoned to Jerusalem: The Life of Henrietta Szold. New York: Harper and Row, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Henrietta Szold (1860-1945) was a social activist whose career began in Baltimore with the founding of a center and night school for recent immigrants from Russia similar to the settlement houses pioneered by Jane Addams. She later founded Hadassah, the Jewish women's organization, and became a leader in the Zionist movement.
Kurtz, Michael J. "Being a Renaissance Man in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore: John Gottlieb Morris." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Summer 1994): 156-69.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "Aaron Aaronsohn; Pioneer Scientist, Spy and Friend of Henrietta Szold." Hadassah Magazine (March 1977): 16-17, 38-42.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. Henrietta Szold: Baltimorean. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1976.
Miller, Donald G. The Scent of Eternity: A Life of Harris Elliott Kirk of Baltimore. Macon: Mercer University Press, 1990.
Shanklin, Thomas L., and Kenneth E. Rowe, eds. "David Creamer and the Baltimore Mob Riot, April 19, 1861." Methodist History 13 (1975): 61-64.
Alexander, Robert L. "Wealth Well Bestowed in Worship: St. Paul's in Baltimore from Robert Cary Long to Richard Upjohn." Maryland Historical Magazine 86 (Summer 1991): 123-150.
Tabak, Israel. "The Lloyd Street Synagogue of Baltimore: A National Shrine." American Jewish Historical Quarterly 61 (1972): 342-352.
Erlick, David P. "The Peales and Gas Lights in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Spring 1985): 9-18.
Annotation / Notes: In 1816 Baltimore became the first city lite by gas lighting. What began as exhibitions at the Peale Museum became the Gas Light Company of Baltimore.
Liebowitz, Steve. "The End of a Jewish Neighborhood: The Life and Death of Lower Park Heights." Generations (Fall 1998): 4-7.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the move of the Jewish community (the people and their institutions) towards the suburbs. A move brought about, in large part, by racism and the search for greater social status.
Liebowitz, Steve. "Mount Washington in Quotations, Part I." History Trails 28 (Autumn 1993-Winter 1994): 1-8; Part II, 28 (Spring-Summer 1994): 9-16.
Annotation / Notes: A compilation of small Mt. Washington articles from a variety of Maryland newspapers.
Ryon, Roderick N. Northwest Baltimore and Its Neighborhoods, 1870-1970 Before "Smart Growth". Baltimore: University of Baltimore Press, 2000.
Ryon, Roderick N. "Upton Historic District: A Walk Through Black History in Baltimore." Keeping Time: The Newsletter of the Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation 2 (Winter 1990): 1, 3-5.
Tommey, Richard, and Fielding Lucas, Jr. First Major Catholic Publisher and Bookseller in Baltimore, Maryland, 1804-1854. M.. L. S. thesis, Catholic University, 1952.
Brunner, Raymond J. "Baltimore Organs and Organbuilding in the Nineteenth Century." Tracker 35, no. 2 (1991): 12.
Annotation / Notes: Well organized and appropriately illustrated, Brunner first summarizes organ-building in Baltimore up to 1850. He then focuses on specific builders James Hall, Henry Berger, August Pomplitz, Charles Strohl, Heilner & Schumacher, Henry Niemann, Adam Stein, and George Barker's Baltimore Organ Co. Drawing on earlier published works by Thomas Eader and John Speller and Orpha Ochse, Brunner's article reveals the competitive sprit felt among various Baltimore congregations, and also the status of this craft in relation to other Eastern seaboard cities.
Eader, Thomas S. "Baltimore Organs and Organ Building." Maryland Historical Magazine 65 (1970): 263-282.
Kares, M. "Baltimore: Center of German-American Organ Building." Tracker 39, no. 3 (1995): 10-17.
Saladini, Robert. American Catholic Church Music: The Baltimore Cathedral. M.A. thesis, Catholic University, 1984.
Adams, Cheryl, and Art Emerson. Religion Collections in Libraries and Archives: A Guide to Resources in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Washington: Humanities and Social Sciences Division, Library of Congress, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Institutional level descriptions for nineteen Maryland libraries and archives holding significant religious collections. A tremendous level of detail is given. Subject headings are assigned to each institution. This guide is also available online at https://www.loc.gov/rr/main/religion/.
Alvarez, Rafael. "It Was Like a Time Capsule." In Hometown Boy: The Hoodle Patrol and Other Curiosities of Baltimore. Baltimore: Baltimore Sun, 1999, 178-179.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore Hebrew University Library.
Fishman, Bernard P. "Back to East Baltimore. An Introduction to the New Jewish Heritage Center." Generations (Fall 1986): 10-11.
Jackl, W. E. "Station Number Eleven of the Enoch Pratt Free Library." Journal of Library History 7 (1972): 141-156.
Annotation / Notes: East Baltimore's Station Number Eleven, which began in two rooms in a settlement house was amazingly successful in servicing its Jewish immigrant population with very mere resources. This article includes some discussion in the early 20th century library controversy of whether or not libraries should collection non-English works. Also stressed is the role the public library played in the Americanization of the immigrant.
Bilhartz, Terry. Urban Religion and the Second Great Awakening: Church and Society in Early National Baltimore. Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson Univerity Press, 1986.