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Thomas, Bettye C. "Public Education and Black Protest in Baltimore, 1865-1900." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Fall 1976): 381-90.
Thompson, Bruce A. The Civil Rights Vanguard: The NAACP and the Black Community in Baltimore, 1931-1942. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1996.
West, Herbert Lee, Jr. Urban Life and Spatial Distribution of Blacks in Baltimore, Maryland. Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: 1940-70.
Whitman, T. Stephen. The Price of Freedom: Slavery and Manumission in Baltimore and Early National Maryland. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1997.
Whitman, Torrey Stephen. Slavery, Manumission, and Free Black Workers in Early National Baltimore. Ph.D. diss., The Johns Hopkins University, 1993.
Chalfant, Randolph W. "Calvert Station: Its Structure and Significance." Maryland Historical Magazine 74 (March 1979): 11-22.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman. The Baltimore Book; New Views of Local History Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: An alternative look at Baltimore's history from a leftist, social activist perspective, the book includes historic photographs of the city's buildings and areas.
Giza, Joanne, and Catherine F.Black. Great Baltimore Houses: An Architectural and Social History. Baltimore: Maclay & Associates, 1982.
Hayward, Mary Ellen. "Rowhouse: A Baltimore Style of Living." Three Centuries of Maryland Architechture, 65-79. Annapolis, MD: Maryland Historical Trust, 1982.
Miller, James Edward. "The Dowager of 33rd Street: Memorial Stadium and the Politics of Big-Time Sports in Maryland, 1954-1991." Maryland Historical Magazine 87 (Summer 1992): 187-200.
Miller, Mark B. Baltimore Transitions; Views of an American City in Flux. Baltimore: Pridemark, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Through historic and contemporary views of the same location, the author illustrates the dramatic effects of the automobile, the high-rise building, and other aspects of modern urban life on the Baltimore of a century ago.
Moudry, Robert M. Gardens, Houses, and People: The Planning of Roland Park, Baltimore. M. A. thesis, Cornell University, 1990.
Olson, Sherry. Baltimore: The Building of an American City. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: Geographer Olson's book, by far the most thorough illustrated history of Baltimore, is strong on geographic and commercial development, and gives less attention to the arts, including architecture. However it does feature many historic photographs of buildings and contemporary news accounts of their construction.
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Neighborhood and City Hall: The Origins of Neighborhood Associations in Baltimore, 1880-1911." Journal of Urban History 6 (November 1979): 3-30.
Beirne, D. Randall. "Hampden - Woodberry: The Mill Village in an Urban Setting." Maryland Historical Magazine 77 (Spring 1982): 6-26.
Annotation / Notes: Although this Baltimore neighborhood is no longer a mill town, the area's geographic and social isolation has allowed it, in many ways, to preserve its mill town character. It is a largely homogenous community, predominantly working class.
Bernard, Richard M. "A Portrait of Baltimore in 1800: Economic and Occupational Patterns in an Early American City." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Winter 1974): 341-60.
Annotation / Notes: This study looks at the social structure and physical location of Baltimore's population during its boom period. The author found Baltimore's rich and poor isolated from each other and the middle class decentralized. Many Baltimoreans worked near their home, while this allowed for the intermixing of people of different occupations, it kept different communities isolated from each other.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.
Curry, Leonard P. "Urbanization and Urbanism in the Old South: A Comparative View." Journal of Southern History 40 (February 1974): 43-60.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore is included in this author's study of the South's pre-1850 urban centers. Curry argues that these centers are often ignored in historian's views of the Old South even though some of the nation's largest cities were located in that region. Contrary to general view, the South did have urban and commercial centers and had more than a passing interest in manufacturing.
Darin, Grace. "The Story of Charles Village: The Building of a Community (1967-1974)." In Charles Village Journal, 6-18. Baltimore: Charles Village Civic Association, 1974.
Delorenzo, Lisa Christine. Neighborhood Stability and Urban Policy: Fortifying the Link. Ph.D. diss., University of Missouri-St. Louis, 1997.
Dürr, William Theodore. The Conscience of A City: A History of the Citizen's Planning and Housing Association and Efforts to Improve Housing for the Poor in Baltimore, Maryland, 1937-1954. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1972.
Eddinger, John W. "The Downtown Clubs." Baltimore 68 (February 1975): 24-31.
Erlick, David P. "The Peales and Gas Lights in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Spring 1985): 9-18.
Annotation / Notes: In 1816 Baltimore became the first city lite by gas lighting. What began as exhibitions at the Peale Museum became the Gas Light Company of Baltimore.