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Simon, David, and Edward Burns. The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood. New York: Broadway Books, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: The story of the people of a drug corner in Baltimore's Franklin Square neighborhood.
Smith, Bert. Down the Ocean: Postcards from Maryland and Delaware Beaches. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Arranged by theme and subject -- famous housing, boardwalk, on the beach, life saving. It presents a vivid picture of life at the shore as interpreted through postcards. Includes some illustration on spots on the way -- diners, bridges, etc. Information on the cards themselves is included and adds to the work's usefulness.
Smith, Bert. Greetings from Baltimore: Postcard Views of the City. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: The history of Baltimore as told through postcards, arranged by subject -- harbor, shopping downtown, monuments, etc. Each section is accompanied by several paragraphs of text. Also included is information on the postcards themselves, as well as on the collecting and history of postcards. Illustrations are excellent, slightly enlarged, and show off the medium.
Suter, Henry. Howard Park: A Fond and Sometimes Accurate History and Descriptions of a Northwest Baltimore Community. Baltimore, MD: Howard Park Civic Association, 1971.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Maryland Hall of Records Commission. A Declaration of the Lord Baltemore's Plantation in Mary-land. 1663; reprint, Annapolis, MD: Maryland Hall of Records Commission, Department of General Services, 1983.
Annotation / Notes: This booklet, issued as part of Maryland's 350th year, includes a facsimile of Lord Baltimore's original description of Maryland's natural resources (plus a remarkable explanation of the Gulf Stream and coastal fisheries!) , and an announcement that the ship "Arke of Mary-land" would sail August 20th, 1633.
Reveal, James L. "'Baltimora:' The Curious Tale of How a Flowering Plant from Mexico was Named for the Maryland City of Baltimore." Calvert Historian 5 (Fall 1990): 1-6.
Hahn, H. George, II. "Twilight Reflections: The Hold of Victorian Baltimore on Lizette Woodworth Reese and H. L. Mencken." The Southern Quarterly 22 (Summer 1984): 5-21.
Annotation / Notes: Although Lizette Woodward Reese and H.L. Mencken were polar opposites in their outlooks and writing styles, both shared nostalgic memories of childhoods in and near Baltimore. This article examines these two major literary figures whose works were informed by their vision of Baltimore's people and places. Mencken admired Reese's poetry which was evocative without being overly sentimental. Both writers published their memories of late nineteenth-century Baltimore that remain important sources for understanding the city through the eyes of two keen observers.
Click, Patricia C. The Spirit of the Times: Amusements in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore, Norfolk, and Richmond. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: This author expertly interweaves a detailed description of work habits, living arrangements, economics, and class structure with the question of what people did for fun. Around 1800 a variety of public entertainments included music, drama, presentational dancing, feats of dexterity and other spectacular offerings -these were held at theatres, circuses, taverns, and pleasure gardens. As the century progressed amusements became increasingly specialized and stratified, serving people of differing economic means, political leanings, and ethnic/religious backgrounds.
Preston, Katherine K. Opera on the Road: Traveling Opera Troupes in the United States, 1825-60. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1993.
Ritchey, David. "Columbia Garden: Baltimore's First Pleasure Garden." Southern Speech Communication Journal 39 (1974): 241-247.
Spencer, William B. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, 1965-1982: The Meyerhoff Years. D.M.A. diss., Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, Peabody Conservatory of Music, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Spencer's dissertation examines the remarkable growth of the orchestra during Joseph Meyerhoff's tenure as chairman of the orchestra's board of trustees. Drawing on the orchestra's extensive historical records, oral history interviews and archival documents at Maryland Historical Society, the Peabody Archives and Pratt's Maryland Room, Spencer paints a vibrant portrait of an orchestra in transition and the struggle to build a performance hall. Union negotiations, race-relations, management strategies, and the changing image of the orchestra are reviewed in depth. Spencer enlivens his text with back-stage stories from musicians and former conductors.
Alvarez, Rafael. "The Quest for Bawlmer's Treasures." In Hometown Boy: The Hoodle Patrol and Other Curiosities of Baltimore. Baltimore: Baltimore Sun, 1999, 40-42.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore City Life Museums.
Baltimore Archives Network, comp. Baltimore's Past: A Directory of Historical Sources. Baltimore: History Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: Much of the contact information is outdated, but it is still the best quick tool for determining who collects what in the Baltimore area.
Boles, John B., ed. Maryland Heritage: Five Baltimore Institutions Celebrate the American Revolution. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: This exhibition catalog joins the efforts of five major collecting institutions through a series of essays and illustrations from their respective exhibits.
Cahill, John J. "The Babe Ruth Museum and Birthplace." Journal of Sport History 24 (1997): 203-5.
Cox, Richard J. Historic Documents Relating to the Early Days of the Colony of Maryland: A Descriptive Catalog of the Exhibition Held at the Central Library in Celebration of the Nation's Bicentennial. Baltimore: Enoch Pratt Free Library, 1976.
Cox, Richard J. "Some Personal Letters of Frederick Calvert, Last Lord Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 70 (Spring 1975): 98-103.
Elfeinbein, Jessica. "Morton K. Blaustein City Life Exhibition Center." The Public Historian 19 (Fall 1997): 91-94.
Annotation / Notes: An academic review of the Baltimore's City Life Museum's exhibit center, published shortly after the Museum was closed.
Epstein, D. M. "Mr. Peabody and his Athenaeum." New Criterion 14 (October 1995): 21-28.
Guertler, John T., ed. The Records of Baltimore's Private Organizations: A Guide to Archival Resources. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1981.
Jackl, W. E. "Station Number Eleven of the Enoch Pratt Free Library." Journal of Library History 7 (1972): 141-156.
Annotation / Notes: East Baltimore's Station Number Eleven, which began in two rooms in a settlement house was amazingly successful in servicing its Jewish immigrant population with very mere resources. This article includes some discussion in the early 20th century library controversy of whether or not libraries should collection non-English works. Also stressed is the role the public library played in the Americanization of the immigrant.
Kalisch, Philip A. The Social History of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Ed.D. diss., The Pennsylvania State University, 1967.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore businessmen, Enoch Pratt, had a goal to establish a free reading library that people could use it to acquire education and make themselves financial successful. Although the first two directors of this library were only moderately successful, they were responsible for laying the groundwork for a strong liberal arts collection, however, there was little outreach into the community. After 1926, the Pratt's directors guided the library to become a leading public library system, known for innovation, and for professional education. The author emphasizes the social objectives of the library and how the Pratt fits into the cultural world of Baltimore.