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Blake, Allison. The Chesapeake Bay Book: A Complete Guide. 3rd edition. Lee, MA: Berkshire House Publishers, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: A well researched tour guide for the general population.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Murphy, Jeanne Payne. "The Letters of Lafayette Buckler from 1859 to 1884." Chronicles of St. Mary's 30 (March 1982): 421-32; (April 1982): 433-44; (May 1982): 445-54.
Annotation / Notes: Transcriptions of a series of 41 letters written by Lafayette to Victoria McGinley Buckler, his wife, as they traveled between their home in St. Mary's and Baltimore. Two letters are also included written by Victoria. The letters deal with the details of daily life and the relationship of this couple. A sizeable introduction proceeds the letters and places the letters in the context of place, time, and family.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Ridgway, Whitman H. Community Leadership in Maryland, 1790-1840. A Comparative Analysis of Power in Society. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Applying social science methodology to reconstruct patterns of decision making and their significance, this work examines the formation of elites in four political communities representing the diversity of the state (Baltimore City, and the counties of Frederick, St. Mary's, and Talbot) in two political eras (the Jeffersonian and the Jacksonian). In the more rural areas, such as St. Mary's and Talbot counties, decision makers overlapped with those who held public office and dominated community affairs, and little changed between the two periods. Where there was greater social and economic diversity, the patterns were considerably different. Elites became more specialized forcing decision makers to accommodate the demands of new leaders who represented a expanding popular political base. Members of the different elites (decisional, commercial, positional and traditional) are identified, along with individual socio-economic information, in the appendices.
Hagaman, Robert A. Personal Battles: The Lives of Maryland's Black Civil War Veterans, 1840-1920. Ph.D. diss., Northern Illinois University, 2004.
Marks, Bayly Ellen. "Rural Response to Urban Penetration: Baltimore and St. Mary's County, Maryland, 1790-1840." Journal of Historical Geography, 8 (April 1082): 113-27.