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Preston, Dickson J. Young Frederick Douglass: The Maryland Years. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: There are a number of excellent biographies of Frederick Douglass including works by Eric Foner, William McFeeley and Benjamin Quarles. For the student of Maryland history, Preston's short but well-researched book focuses on the first twenty years of Douglass' life spent in Talbot County and Baltimore City. His experiences as a slave in Maryland shaped his subsequent career and thus are critical to understanding one of the greatest spokesmen for human rights.
Blake, Allison. The Chesapeake Bay Book: A Complete Guide. 3rd edition. Lee, MA: Berkshire House Publishers, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: A well researched tour guide for the general population.
Browne, Gary L. "Urban Centers of the Past." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Fall 1984): 6-7.
Annotation / Notes: A variety of factors effect the rise and fall of urban centers -- transportation, market, environmental, and political changes, as well as the rise of other centers. Browne presents a brief discussion of the fate of approximately ten urban centers.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Smith, Bert. Down the Ocean: Postcards from Maryland and Delaware Beaches. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Arranged by theme and subject -- famous housing, boardwalk, on the beach, life saving. It presents a vivid picture of life at the shore as interpreted through postcards. Includes some illustration on spots on the way -- diners, bridges, etc. Information on the cards themselves is included and adds to the work's usefulness.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Gelbert, Doug. Company Museums, Industry Museums, and Industrial Tours: A Guidebook of Sites in the United States That Are Open to the Public. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 1994. 94-104.
Annotation / Notes: Brief descriptions of fifteen industrial sites in Maryland. When considering sites on this topic most museum goers would probably know of the Baltimore Museum of Industry but people may overlook many of the other sites covered, such as the Ocean City Lifesaving Station Museum, the Poultry Hall of Fame, and the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Visitor Center.
Ridgway, Whitman Hawley. A Social Analysis of Maryland Community Elites, 1827-1836: A Study of the Distribution of Power in Baltimore City, Frederick County and Talbot County. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1973.
Ridgway, Whitman H. Community Leadership in Maryland, 1790-1840. A Comparative Analysis of Power in Society. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Applying social science methodology to reconstruct patterns of decision making and their significance, this work examines the formation of elites in four political communities representing the diversity of the state (Baltimore City, and the counties of Frederick, St. Mary's, and Talbot) in two political eras (the Jeffersonian and the Jacksonian). In the more rural areas, such as St. Mary's and Talbot counties, decision makers overlapped with those who held public office and dominated community affairs, and little changed between the two periods. Where there was greater social and economic diversity, the patterns were considerably different. Elites became more specialized forcing decision makers to accommodate the demands of new leaders who represented a expanding popular political base. Members of the different elites (decisional, commercial, positional and traditional) are identified, along with individual socio-economic information, in the appendices.
Hait, Michael G. "Free and Enslaved: John and Melinda Human/Newman of Talbot County and Baltimore, Maryland." National Genealogical Society Quarterly, 103(June 2015): 115-27.