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Dash, Joan. Summoned to Jerusalem: The Life of Henrietta Szold. New York: Harper and Row, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Henrietta Szold (1860-1945) was a social activist whose career began in Baltimore with the founding of a center and night school for recent immigrants from Russia similar to the settlement houses pioneered by Jane Addams. She later founded Hadassah, the Jewish women's organization, and became a leader in the Zionist movement.
Dubansky, Mindell. Guess Who Died?: Memories of Baltimore with Recipes. Rosendale, NY: Women's Studio Workshop, 1999.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. Henrietta Szold: Baltimorean. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1976.
Martin, Ralph G. The Woman He Loved: The Story of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1974.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Darin, Grace. "The Story of Charles Village: The Building of a Community (1967-1974)." In Charles Village Journal, 6-18. Baltimore: Charles Village Civic Association, 1974.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Gray, Ralph D., and Gerald E. Hartdagen. "A Glimpse of Baltimore Society in 1827: Letters by Henry D. Gilpin." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Fall 1974): 256-70.
Annotation / Notes: Gilpin, a young lawyer from Philadelphia, wrote five lengthy letters to his father while visiting the Baltimore area in September, 1827. He described the people he met, many of whom were very important in Baltimore society, many were also the family and associates of Charles Carroll of Carrollton. In these letters he presents an insightful view of the life of the area's upper class. Of special interest is his descriptions of the major houses of Doughoregan Manor, Homewood, and Oakland.
Murphy, Jeanne Payne. "The Letters of Lafayette Buckler from 1859 to 1884." Chronicles of St. Mary's 30 (March 1982): 421-32; (April 1982): 433-44; (May 1982): 445-54.
Annotation / Notes: Transcriptions of a series of 41 letters written by Lafayette to Victoria McGinley Buckler, his wife, as they traveled between their home in St. Mary's and Baltimore. Two letters are also included written by Victoria. The letters deal with the details of daily life and the relationship of this couple. A sizeable introduction proceeds the letters and places the letters in the context of place, time, and family.
Nast, Leonara Heilig, Laurence N. Krause, and R. C. Monk, eds. Baltimore. A Living Renaissance. Baltimore: Historic Baltimore Society, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: An eclectic mix of over eighty essays, authored by a broad spectrum of individuals, on topics that illustrate the renaissance that Baltimore experienced during the 1960s and 1970s. Organized under such broad topics as "Baltimore Builds","Social Perspective","The Arts", and "What Makes Baltimore Baltimore" the broad range of subjects covered include Baltimore night life, public housing, television and radio, football, aging services, and influential political and community figures. Includes a brief chronology of the City's redevelopment, 1937-1981.
Baltimore Museum of Art. :Annual I The Museum: Its First Half Century. Baltimore: The Baltimore Museum of Art, 1966.
Annotation / Notes: A history of the first fifty years of the BMA, from its start as a City-Wide Congress Committee on Founding an Art Museum (1911), to its temporary home in Mount Vernon, to the construction of its permanent home in Wyman Park. A major thesis is that a very modern thinking museum became a great success in a city known for being conservative. Nicely illustrated with works from the collection and photographs of museum activities.
Beirne, Francis F. "The Four Merchants." In The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Berry, John. "Librarian of the Year: 1995: Carla D. Hayden: Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore." Library Journal 121 (January 1996): 36.
Dennis, Samuel K. "A Brief Summary of the Maryland Historical Society's Hundred Years." Maryland Historical Magazine 39 (March 1944): 1-5.
Gustafson, E. H. "Museum Accessions." Antiques 138 (December 1990): 1174.
Annotation / Notes: Quilts at the Maryland Historical Society.
Gustafson, E. H. "Library Journal Selects Dr. Carla D. Hayden as the 1995 Librarian of the Year." Jet 89 (March 4, 1996): 22.
Gustafson, E. H. "Maryland's Best Kept Humanities Secrets: Civil War Museums and Sites in Maryland." Maryland Humanities (Spring 1998): 27.
Gustafson, E. H. "Maryland's Best Kept Humanities Secrets: Star-Spangled Banner Flag House and Museum." Maryland Humanities (September 1998): 27.
Gustafson, E. H. "Maryland's Best Kept Humanities Secrets: Textile Collection at the Maryland Historical Society Museum." Maryland Humanities (September 2000): 27.
Requardt, Cynthia Horsburgh. "Women's Deeds in Women's Words: Manuscripts in the Maryland Historical Society." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (June 1978): 186-204.
Bentley, Amy. "Wages of War: The Shifting Landscape of Race and Gender in World War II Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Winter 1993): 420-43.
Annotation / Notes: Bentley examines the impact of the dramatic changes occasioned by World War II-era production in Baltimore. In terms of race, while Jim Crow patterns prevailed in various arenas, most notably housing, new employment opportunities eventually became available as well, especially in such critical industries as steel and other war-related industries. Similarly, the role of women in employment expanded even as traditional roles were reaffirmed. Bentley argues that new wartime values challenged conventional stereotypes regarding race and gender and provided the basis for eventual changes.
Rice, James D. "Laying Claim to Elizabeth Shoemaker: Family Violence on Baltimore's Waterfront, 1808-1812." In Over the Threshold: Intimate Violence in Early America. New York: Routledge, 1999.
Addison-Darneille, and Henrietta Stockton. "For Better or For Worse." Civil War Times Illustrated 31 (May/June 1992): 32-35, 73.
Agnew, Elizabeth N. Charity, Friendly Visiting, and Social Work: Mary E. Richmond and the Shaping of an American Profession. Ph.D. diss., Indiana University, 1999.
Ayers, Bonnie Joe. "Sadie Miller." Maryland 17 (Autumn 1984): 39-41.