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Trimble, Logan C. "Middling Planters and the Strategy of Diversification in Baltimore County, Maryland, 1750-1776." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (Summer 1990): 171-78.
Diggs, Louis S. In Our Voices: A Folk History in Legacy. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 1998.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Hall, Robert L. "Slave Resistance in Baltimore City and County, 1747-1790." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 305-18.
Hurry, Robert J. "An Archeological and Historical Perspective on Benjamin Banneker." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 361-69.
Annotation / Notes: The author provides a survey of the Banneker family farm in southwestern Baltimore County. While most scholarship has focused on Benjamin Banneker's career and achievements as a mathematician, surveyor and astronomer, since the 1970s, scholarship and public funding have helped to illuminate his life as a land-owning farmer. The Bannekers were one of the first African-American families to own land in the Piedmont region of Maryland; Benjamin's father, Robert purchased one hundred acres in 1737.
Kimmel, Ross M. "Free Blacks in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Spring 1976): 19-25.
McDonald, Leib. "The Christiana Riot." History Trails 31 (Winter 1996-Spring 1997): 9-11.
Orser, W. Edward. "Neither Separate Nor Equal: Foreshadowing Brown in Baltimore County, 1935-1937." Maryland Historical Magazine 92 (Spring 1997): 4-35.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Fee, Elizabeth, et. al. "Baltimore by Bus: Steering a New Course through the City's History." Radical History Review 28-30 (1984): 206-216.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the development of the alternative, left oriented "People's Bus Tour" of Baltimore. The tour's intention was to demonstrate the diversity of Baltimore and to show the conflicts and processes that affected the City's working class. Class relations are interpreted throughout Baltimore's history by visiting significant and visually interesting places.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Olson, Sherry H. Baltimore: The Building of an American City. Revised edition. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: The product of a geographer, this excellent history of Baltimore focuses on its physical growth as an urban center. Special emphasis is placed on how the city, and its inhabitants, handled the changes brought about by city growth.
Diggs, Louis S. Holding On To Their Heritage. Catonsville, MD: privately printed, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore County African-American communities: Bond Avenue, Reisterstown; Piney Grove, Boring.
Diggs, Louis S. In Our Own Voices: A Folk History in Legacy. Catonsville, MD: Uptown Press, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore County African-American communities: Chattolanee, Cowdensville, Oblate Sisters of Providence.
Diggs, Louis S. It All Started on Winters Lane: A History of the Black Community in Catonsville, Maryland. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: A compilation on the history of the historic African American community of Winters Lane in Catonsville, this volume includes a rich collection of family history and documents related to the history of black churches, civic organizations, businesses, and social groups. It also provides several extensive oral histories with elders in the community. Like many African American communities in Baltimore County, Winters Lane had its roots in the pre-Civil War era as a settlement of free blacks who worked on area farms and in the growing village, and it has persisted into the modern period of suburbanization. Louis Diggs in this and other volumes on the county's historic African American communities includes an extensive set of photos and other documents previously unpublished on local black family and community life.
Orser, W. Edward. "Neither Separate Nor Equal: Foreshadowing Brown in Baltimore County, 1935-1937." Maryland Historical Magazine 92 (Spring 1997), 5-35.
Annotation / Notes: Orser investigates a legal challenge to school segregation in Baltimore County in the 1930s. Argued by Thurgood Marshall, just after he joined the NAACP legal staff, the case tested the adequacy of the county's educational system for African Americans, which provided only for elementary schools in the county and for a limited number of tuition grants to attend high school in Baltimore City. Maryland courts ruled against Marshall and the NAACP at the time, but Orser contends that the court decisions laid the basis for the legal strategy which eventually succeeded before the U. S. Supreme Court in 1954.
Orser, Edward, and Joseph Arnold. Catonsville, 1880-1940: From Village to Suburb. Norfolk, VA: Donning Pubishing Co., 1989.
Annotation / Notes: This photographic history traces the history of Catonsville, on Baltimore County's west side, from the 1880s, when the village center served the needs of travelers on Frederick Road and the surrounding agricultural area, as well as afforded sites for summer homes for some of Baltimore's elite, to 1940, when growth, development, and transportation links heightened its suburban character within the Baltimore metropolitan region. The volume includes research evidence on the social make-up of the community, such as the impact of German and Irish immigrants and the role of its historic African American community.
Lancaster, Kent. "Chattel Slavery at Hampton/Northampton, Baltimore County." Maryland Historical Magazine 95 (Winter 2000): 409-27.
Diggs, Louis S. Grave Site Identification Project: Mt. Gilboa African Methodist EpiscopalChurch, 2312 Westchester Avenue, Oella, and the Hall Family Cemetery, 348 Oella Avenue, Oella. Baltimore: [s.n.], 2001.
Diggs, Louis S. Surviving in America: Histories of 7 Black Communities in Baltimore County, Maryland: Oakland Park Road, Relay, Oella, Halethorpe, Granite, Church Lane, Winands Road. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2002.
Diggs, Louis S. From the Meadows to the Point: The Histories of the African American Community of Turner Station and What Was the African American Community in Sparrows Point. Baltimore: The Author, 2003.
Hagaman, Robert A. Personal Battles: The Lives of Maryland's Black Civil War Veterans, 1840-1920. Ph.D. diss., Northern Illinois University, 2004.
Hynson, Jerry M. Absconders, Runaways and Other Fugitives in the Baltimore City and County, Maryland Jail, 1831-1864. Westminster, MD: Willow Bend Books,2004.