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McGrain, John. An Agricultural History of Baltimore County, Maryland. Towson, MD: published by the author, 1990.
Trimble, Logan C. "Middling Planters and the Strategy of Diversification in Baltimore County, Maryland, 1750-1776." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (Summer 1990): 171-78.
Cross, Philip S. "A Life at Rayville - Part II." History Trails 14 (Winter 1980): 5-8.
Annotation / Notes: Reminiscences of Baltimore County from the 1840s to the 1920s.
Mascari, Ruth. "A Parkton Girlhood." History Trails 17 (Spring 1983): 9- 10.
Parry, Ann Hollingsworth. "Domestic Life on a Farm near Glen Falls." History Trails 31 (Winter 1996-Spring 1997): 8.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Hooper, Carol E., and William Hollifield. "Aigburth Vale." History Trails 32-33 (Summer-Autumn 1998): 13-16, 1-4.
Scarff, John H. Hampton, Baltimore County, Maryland. Baltimore: Society for the Preservation of Maryland Antiquities, 1954.
Thomas, Dawn F. The Green Spring Valley: Its History and Heritage, Vol. 1: A History and Historic Houses. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1978.
Anson, Melanie D. Olmsted's Sudbrook: The Making of a Community. Baltimore: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotation / Notes: Sudbrook Park is one of the few neighborhoods where Frank Law Olmsted's plan was carried out to its entirety. It is a nationally significant example of community design. It was the first, and most important, Olmsted suburb in the region.
Anson, Melanie D. "Belfast Road - Reflections of Mr. Webster Bosley and Other Residents of the Belfast Area." Baltimore County Historical Society Newsletter (November-December 1979): [2-4].
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Brooks, Neal A. "The Northern Chesapeake: Perspectives on Early Baltimore and Harford Counties." Harford Historical Bulletin 38 (Fall 1988): 95-98.
Brooks, Neal, and Richard Parsons. Baltimore County Panorama. Towson, MD: Baltimore County Public Library, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: A pictorial history reflecting the story of the County's development, arranged by nine themes -- schools, transportation, houses, events. It includes a good full text and makes use of mixed media, such as maps. This work is also noteworthy for its postscript of additional information on certain images.
Browne, Gary L. "Urban Centers of the Past." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Fall 1984): 6-7.
Annotation / Notes: A variety of factors effect the rise and fall of urban centers -- transportation, market, environmental, and political changes, as well as the rise of other centers. Browne presents a brief discussion of the fate of approximately ten urban centers.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.
Clemens, Shirley B., and Clarence E Clemens. From Marble Hill to Maryland Line: An Informal History of Northern Baltimore County. N.p.: Published by the authors, 1976.
Coale, Joseph M. Middling Planters of Ruxton, 1694-1850. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: A history of this Baltimore County community arranged around the seven land patents that define that portion of the County. The author makes a broad use of primary sources and touches upon the history of the churches, towns, and schools.
Cramm, Joetta. Historic Ellicott City: A Walking Tour. First edition. Sykesville, MD: Greenberg Publishing, Co., 1990; second edition. Woodbine, MD: K&D, Ltd., 1996.
Cross, E. May. "The Patent Medicine Show and Other Events at Rayville." History Trails 33 (Spring 1999): 9-12.
Cross, E. May. Dundalk, Then & Now 1894-1980. Dundalk, MD: Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society, 1980.
Fee, Elizabeth, et. al. "Baltimore by Bus: Steering a New Course through the City's History." Radical History Review 28-30 (1984): 206-216.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the development of the alternative, left oriented "People's Bus Tour" of Baltimore. The tour's intention was to demonstrate the diversity of Baltimore and to show the conflicts and processes that affected the City's working class. Class relations are interpreted throughout Baltimore's history by visiting significant and visually interesting places.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Forbes, Marie. Speaking of Our Past. A Narrative History of Owings Mills, Maryland, 1640-1988. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1988.