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Agle, Anna Bradford, and Sidney Hovey Wanzer, eds. "Dearest Braddie: Love and War in Maryland, 1860-61, Part I." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Spring 1993): 73-88.
Annotation / Notes: Letters from Edward Spencer to Anne Catherine Bradford Harrison, written during their courtship in late 1860 and 1861, provide evidence of tensions related to Unionist vs. Secessionist sentiment in Maryland in the critical months leading up to the Civil War. Edward initially hopes that the Union can be preserved, but increasingly expresses alarm at actions by the new Republican administration to assure Maryland's loyalty, by coercion if necessary. Tender expressions of affection alternate with extended passages of intense political commentary. The letters and other Spencer papers are from the collection of the Milton Eisenhower Library of Johns Hopkins University.
Anson, Melanie. Olmsted's Sudbrook: The Making of a Community. Baltimore, MD: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotation / Notes: Anson chronicles the history of Baltimore County's Sudbrook Park, a significant example of a residential community planned by noted landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. Olmsted's "General Plan for Sudbrook" in 1889 epitomized the suburban ideal which he championed, with its separation from the city, yet link for commuting via the nearby Western Maryland Railway line; spacious lots and set backs for cottage-style houses; shared common spaces and amenities; and romantic, naturalistic setting. Anson traces the evolution of the development of Sudbrook, as well as the nature of community social life from the 1890s to the present.
Brooks, Neale A., and Eric G. Rockel. A History of Baltimore County. Towson, MD: Friends of the Towson Library, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore County inspired by the United States bicentennial, this comprehensive volume traces the evolution of the county which once represented the sole political jurisdiction in the region. Early settlement led to subdivision to establish other counties, and the growth of Baltimore City produced eventual separation of legal and governmental functions between county and city in the 1850s. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries growth and expansion of the city further eroded the county's space in the annexations of 1888 and 1918. The book concludes with consideration of the suburban boom of the post-World War II period and its impact on the county's politics. Extensive source notes make this a valuable resource for students of Baltimore County social history.
Diggs, Louis S. It All Started on Winters Lane: A History of the Black Community in Catonsville, Maryland. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: A compilation on the history of the historic African American community of Winters Lane in Catonsville, this volume includes a rich collection of family history and documents related to the history of black churches, civic organizations, businesses, and social groups. It also provides several extensive oral histories with elders in the community. Like many African American communities in Baltimore County, Winters Lane had its roots in the pre-Civil War era as a settlement of free blacks who worked on area farms and in the growing village, and it has persisted into the modern period of suburbanization. Louis Diggs in this and other volumes on the county's historic African American communities includes an extensive set of photos and other documents previously unpublished on local black family and community life.
Orser, Edward, and Joseph Arnold. Catonsville, 1880-1940: From Village to Suburb. Norfolk, VA: Donning Pubishing Co., 1989.
Annotation / Notes: This photographic history traces the history of Catonsville, on Baltimore County's west side, from the 1880s, when the village center served the needs of travelers on Frederick Road and the surrounding agricultural area, as well as afforded sites for summer homes for some of Baltimore's elite, to 1940, when growth, development, and transportation links heightened its suburban character within the Baltimore metropolitan region. The volume includes research evidence on the social make-up of the community, such as the impact of German and Irish immigrants and the role of its historic African American community.
Waesche, James F. Crowning the Gravelly Hill: A History of the Roland Park-Guilford-Homeland District. Baltimore: Maclay and Associates, 1987.
Annotation / Notes: Waesche chronicles the history of the north Baltimore communities developed by the Roland Park Company in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries which set the standard for elite suburban-style residency in the era. Under the direction of Edward Bouton, the three adjacent communities bore the stamp of Frederick Law Olmsted's landscape firm, which did some of the planning. The volume focuses upon building and development, with some attention to the social life of suburbs intended by Bouton to "catch the whole of the better class suburban development of the city."
Van Horn, Martin K., and Robert L. Williams. Green Spring Accommodation: 130 Years of Railway History in the Green Spring Valley, Baltimore County, Maryland, 1832-1962. Polo, IL: Transportation Trails, 1996.
Olson, Karen Faith. When a Woman Has a Working Life: The Transformation of Gender Relations in a Steelmaking Community. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: Captures the social world of steelworkers' wives in Dundalk, Maryland, through sixty interviews. A planned industrial community from the 1880s, steel dominated life in Dundalk. Male work culture, swing shifts, and high wages served company needs and kept women out of the paid labor force. A decline in steelmaking forced women to "get a working life," which has altered role expectations and gender relations in that community. Class bias and racial divisions are also factors in this transformation.
Torchia, Robert Wilson. "Eliza Ridgely and the Ideal of American Womanhood." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Winter 1995): 404-23.
Annotation / Notes: Argues that Thomas Sully's painting Lady with a Harp: Eliza Ridgely was a propaganda piece to counter the British stereotype of American women as "being unsophisticated, ignorant, and devoid of social graces" (406). This portrait of fifteen-year-old Ridgely shows grace, poise, feminity, and other traits (including instrumental music) associated with British of true womanhood.
Hayden, Emily Spencer, photog., and Patricia Dockman Anderson, comp. "Portfolio." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (1996): 65-72.
Hagaman, Robert A. Personal Battles: The Lives of Maryland's Black Civil War Veterans, 1840-1920. Ph.D. diss., Northern Illinois University, 2004.
Hynson, Jerry M. Absconders, Runaways and Other Fugitives in the Baltimore City and County, Maryland Jail, 1831-1864. Westminster, MD: Willow Bend Books,2004.
Greenberg, Rose. The Chronicle of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation 1830-1975. N.p.: 1976.
Michel, Robert E. Colonel Harry Gilmor's Raid Around Baltimore July 10th to 13th, 1864. Baltimore: Erbe Publishers, 1976.
Lovis, John B. "The Blast Furnaces of Sparrows Point (1887-1957): The History of Ten Furnaces and a Company Town." Canal History and Technology Proceedings, 24 (2005): 119-49.
Clifford, James. "The Battles That Saved America: North Point and Baltimore, September 1814." On Point: Journal of Army History, 10 (no. 2, 2004): 9-15.
Baltimore Antique Bottle Club. Baltimore Bottle Book: An Annotated List of Bottles from Baltimore City and Baltimore County, 1820-1990. Baltimore: Baltimore Antique Bottle Club, 2007.
Davis, Erick F. "The Baltimore County Horse Guard." History Trails, 10 (Winter 1975-76): 5-10.
Annotation / Notes: Civil War.
Hinda, Virginia Horner. OUr Horner Ancestors: William of Lafayette County, Pa., Son of Thomas of Baltimore County, Md. Family Genealogy Ca. 1700-1973. Chicago: Adams Press, 1974.
Hollowak, Thomas L. Index to Marriages and Deaths in the (Baltimore) Sun, 1837-1850. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1978.
Steffen, Charles G. "Changes in the Organization of Artisan Production in Baltimore, 1780 to 1820." William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series, 36 (January 1979): 101-17.
Steffen, Charles G. "The Pre-Industrial Iron Worker: Northampton Iron Works, 1780-1820." Labor History, 20 (Winter 1979): 89-110.
Eliassen, Meredith. "A Soldier's Dilemma: Francis R. Shunk's Account for the Battle of Baltimore, 1814." Maryland Historian, 31 (Fall 2007): 67-80.
Rowe, Ella. "Pastorial Records of the Rev'd John R. Keech, Christ Church, St. John's Parish Baltimore and Harford Counties, Maryland 1819-1861." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin, 20 (Fall 1979): 269-86.
Hollifield, William. "Franklin Academy in 1834." History Trails, 18 (Spring 1984): 9-10.
Annotation / Notes: Reisterstown school.