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Clague, Cristin D. "The Calverts: Migration in History." Calvert Historian 13 (Fall 1998): 19-24.
Foster, James W., and Susan R. Falk. George Calvert: The Early Years. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1983.
Hoffman, Ronald. Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland: A Carroll Saga, 1500 - 1782. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press/Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: Among the signers of the Declaration of Independence, Maryland's Charles Carroll of Carrollton was conspicuously different from most of his colleagues. Fabulously wealthy and Roman Catholic, Carroll was very aware of his family's origins as traditional leaders in their former Irish homeland. Ronald Hoffman skillfully recounts the story of this family's successful struggle to maintain its status in the face of official religious intolerance. In surveying the path that led from Ely O'Carroll in Ireland to the shores of the Chesapeake, Hoffman helps explain why a very conservative family would embrace the cause of revolution.
Zseleczky, James Waters. "Anne Mynne of Hertingfordbury, Wife of George Calvert, First Lord Baltimore (1579-1622)." Chronicles of St. Mary's 22 (September 1974): 397-99.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
David, Jonathan. "The Sermon and the Shout: A History of the Singing and Praying Bands of Maryland and Delaware." Southern Folklore Quarterly 51, no. 3 (1994): 241-63.
Eltis, David, Stephen D. Behrendt, David Richardson, and Herbert S. Klein. The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: A Database on CD-ROM. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Jordan, Winthrop. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
Forman, H. Chandlee. The Architecture of the Old South: The Medieval Style, 1585-1850. New York: Russell & Russell, 1948; reprint, 1968.
Lebherz, Ann, and Mary Margrabe. Pre-1800 Houses of Frederick County, Volume II. Frederick, MD: Frederick County Historical Society, 1999.
Boyd, Thomas Hulings Stockton. The History of Montgomery County, Maryland, from its earliest settlement in 1650 to 1879. Clarksburgh, MD [Baltimore, W. K. Boyle & son, printers], 1879; reprint, Baltimore: Regional Pub. Co, 1968.
Annotation / Notes: Written following the American, and the County's, Centennial, this work places special emphasis on land grants and prominent men. Includes a directory of the towns, villages, and residents.
Carr, Lois Green. "The Metropolis of Maryland': A Comment on Town Development Along the Tobacco Coast." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Summer 1974): 124-45.
Annotation / Notes: Many towns in the Chesapeake area failed during the seventeenth century. Towns were not needed as commercial centers for the tobacco trade, the major economy of the area at that time. Carr uses St. Mary's City as an example of such a failure.
Hoffman, Charles W. "The Indian Names of Frederick County." Historical Society of Frederick County, Inc., Newsletter (May 1991): 2.
Johnston, George. History of Cecil County, Maryland. Elkton: Published by the author. 1881.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "Shipley's Choice: A Community Name with Historical Significance; Part I: The Shipley Clan." Anne Arundel County History Notes 20 (January 1989): 3-5.
Marks, Lillian Bayly. Reister's Desire: The Origin of Reisterstown, Maryland, Founded 1758, With a Genealogical History of the Reister Family and Sketches of Allied Families. N.p.: Published by the author, 1975.
Annotation / Notes: A history of the early development of today's Reisterstown as documented primarily through land records. The largest portion of this work is dedicated to the genealogy of the Reister, and allied, families.
Williams, T .J. C. The History of Washington County, Maryland, From the Earliest Settlements of the Present Time, Including A History of Hagerstown. Baltimore: Regional Publishing Co., 1968.
Wood, Gregory A. Early French Presence in Maryland 1524-1800. Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1977.
Ashby, Wallace L. Fossils of Calvert Cliffs. Solomons, MD: Calvert Marine Museum Press, 1979.
Bernstein, L. R. Minerals of the Washington, D.C. area. Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey, 1980.
Force, Peter. Tracts and Other Papers Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America: From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776. Washington, DC: Peter Force, 1836.
Annotation / Notes: At least Volumes I, and IV contain material relevant to Chesapeake Environment. Force performed a valuable service codifying and publishing these in the early nineteenth century, before some of the sources were lost. Volume IV contains Colony founder Father Andrew White's "Relation" of Maryland to Lord Baltimore, and his "Narrative of a Voyage to Virginia". In the relation of events of 1642 the text records what is plausibly, the first and only lethal shark attack in Chesapeake history. p. 37 in Force's Vol. IV.
Glaser, John D. Collecting Fossils in Maryland. Baltimore: State of Maryland, Dept. of Natural Resources, Maryland Geological Survey, 1995.
Hariot, Thomas. Narrative of the first English plantation of Virginia. 1588; reprint London: N.p., 1893).
Hulton, Paul. America, 1585: The Complete Drawings of John White. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: These are the first "pictures" of this region, accurately depicting marine, terrestrial and avian species, and both Native Americans and sundry of their crafts. They are widely applicable to the nearby Chesapeake Indians and some drawings may directly depict Bay life because John White explored there during his stay.