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Adler, Larry. It Ain't Necessarily So. New York: Grove Press, 1987.
Annotation / Notes: Autobiography of a Baltimore-born musician.
Delaplaine, Edward S. John Phillip Sousa and the National Anthem. Frederick, MD: Great Southern Press, 1983.
Kravetz, Sallie. Ethel Ennis, the Reluctant Jazz Star: An Illustrated Biography. Baltimore: Gateway Press/Hughes Enterprises, 1984.
Maturi, Richard J. Francis X. Bushman: A Biography and Filmography. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 1998.
Otter, William. History of My Own Times or, the Life and Adventures of William Otter, Sen. Comprising a Series of Events, and Musical Incidents Altogether Original. Emmitsburg, MD: n.p., 1835; reprint. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: William Otter (1787-1856) has left an entertaining autobiography of his life as a plasterer and practical jokester. Originally published in Emmitsburg in 1835, Otter's History offers an unusual glimpse into social history from an artisan's perspective. Whether Otter's humorous adventures and anecdotes are all true is debatable. His story does, however, suggest a continuation of the irreverent Maryland personality seen in the works of Ebenezer Cooke, Dr. Alexander Hamilton and Meshack Browning.
Price, Walter W. "The Bashford Amphitheater's Name." Glades Star 6 (June 1990): 412-14.
Schaaf, Elizabeth. "George Peabody: His Life and Legacy, 1795-1869." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Fall 1995): 268-85.
Annotation / Notes: George Peabody's legacy to Baltimore transcends the music conservatory and magnificent library that bear his name. His gifts influenced other wealthy friends whose philanthropy help establish some of the great educational and cultural institutions that grace the city: the Johns Hopkins University, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the Walters Art Gallery. This article surveys the life of a man admired and respected on both sides of the Atlantic.
Dudley, David. "James Hubert 'Eubie' Blake." Baltimore 92 (March 1999): 38-39.
Talbert, Christine. "Ira Aldrige - Shakespearean Actor [and] Black Contemporary to Edwin Booth." Harford Historical Bulletin 15 (Winter 1983): 10-11.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Beirne, Francis F. Brunswick, 100 Years of Memories. Brunswick, MD: Brunswick-Potomac Foundation, Inc., 1990.
Annotation / Notes: As the preface clearly states this is not a "scholarly book", however, it is an interesting scrapbook of information on almost any imaginable subject relating to Brunswick. An encyclopedia of the compilers memories and their view of the history of the community. The source and writer of each entry is clearly identified. A chapter of distinguished citizens is included and three pages of songs.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Archer, Stephen M. Junius Brutus Booth. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1992.
Brunner, Raymond J. "Baltimore Organs and Organbuilding in the Nineteenth Century." Tracker 35, no. 2 (1991): 12.
Annotation / Notes: Well organized and appropriately illustrated, Brunner first summarizes organ-building in Baltimore up to 1850. He then focuses on specific builders James Hall, Henry Berger, August Pomplitz, Charles Strohl, Heilner & Schumacher, Henry Niemann, Adam Stein, and George Barker's Baltimore Organ Co. Drawing on earlier published works by Thomas Eader and John Speller and Orpha Ochse, Brunner's article reveals the competitive sprit felt among various Baltimore congregations, and also the status of this craft in relation to other Eastern seaboard cities.
Clarke, Donald. Wishing on the Moon: The Life and Times of Billie Holiday. New York: Viking Penguin, 1994.
Cox, Richard J. "A New Source for Robert Bensley, English Actor: A Research Note." Theatre Survey 18 (May 1977): 99-101.
Annotation / Notes: Bensley was a brother-in-law of James Cheston of Maryland; based upon documents from Cheston/Galloway Papers, MS. 1994, at the Maryland Historical Society.
Deutsch, Helen Waverly. Laura Keene's Theatre Management: Profile of a Profession in Transition. Ph.D. diss., Tufts University, 1992.
Dowell, Susan Stiles. "Easton's Avalon Theatre: A Dream Reborn." Maryland 22 (Summer 1990): 42-47.
Drake, James A. Rosa Ponselle: A Centenary Biography. Portland, OR: Amadeus/Timber, 1997.
George, Luvenia Anne. The Early Piano Rags (1899-1916) of James Hubert ('Eubie') Blake: A Stylistic Study and Annotated Edition. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1995.
Heintze, James R. "Alexander Malcolm: Musician, Clergyman, and Schoolmaster." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 226-35.
Hildebrand, David, and Ginger. Music of the Charles Carroll Family, 1785-1832. Annapolis: David & Ginger Hildebrand, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Compact disc recording, extensive liner notes, Albany Records TROY056.
Jones, James Nathan. Alfred Jack Thomas (1884-1962) Musician, Composer, Educator. M.A. thesis, Morgan State University, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Through Army records, the pages of the Afro American, and interviews with musicians who worked and studied with Alfred Jack Thomas, Jones brings to life the world of the classically trained African-American musician during segregation. One of the first Black bandmasters in the U.S. Army, composer, and conductor (the first Black conductor to lead the all-white Baltimore Symphony Orchestra) A. Jack Thomas was a major force in Maryland's African-American musical community from World War I until his retirement in 1955. Thomas, an outstanding athlete who attended college on a boxing scholarship, rode with the 10th U.S. Cavalry in the American West and served under General John J. Pershing during his campaign to put down the revolutionary forces under Pancho Villa. In 1921 Thomas fought to establish the first Black municipal band in Baltimore and became its conductor. He chaired the Music Department at Morgan College and was a member of the faculty of Howard University.
O'Meally, Robert G. Lady Day: The Many Faces of Billie Holiday. New York: Arcade Pub., 1991.
Phillips-Matz, Mary Jane. Rosa Ponselle: American Diva. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1997.