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Blumgart, Pamela James, et. al. At the Head of the Bay: A Cultural and Architectural History of Cecil County, Maryland. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical Trust Press, 1996.
Boden, Mrs. Harry Clark, IV. Mount Harmon Plantation at World's End Cecil County, MD N.p.: Published by the author, 1976.
Brockmann, R. John. "Feeling 'The Old' on Main Street in Warwick." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 75 (Winter 1997): 1, 4-5.
Ewing, Mrs. Cecil E. "The Mitchell House, Fair Hill, Maryland." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 46 (May 19, 1975): [2-3] .
McKee, Sally A. "What is my History?" Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 61 (April 1992): 4-5.
Blumgart, Pamela James, ed. At the Head of the Bay: A Cultural and Architectural History of Cecil County, Maryland. Elkton, MD: Cecil Historical Trust, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: This beautifully illustrated book presents a history of the development of the county along with a history of its architecture, including house forms, methods of construction, and outbuildings, along with brief write-ups on 700 historic sites.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Smith, Bert. Down the Ocean: Postcards from Maryland and Delaware Beaches. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Arranged by theme and subject -- famous housing, boardwalk, on the beach, life saving. It presents a vivid picture of life at the shore as interpreted through postcards. Includes some illustration on spots on the way -- diners, bridges, etc. Information on the cards themselves is included and adds to the work's usefulness.
Weeks, Christopher. "Bouncing Along the Post Road: Eighteenth Century Harford County as Seen by Travelers." Harford Historical Bulletin 57 (Summer 1993): 74-127.
Annotation / Notes: Annotated excerpts from ten contemporary descriptions of traveling along the post road. The authors include such well known Colonial figures as Dr. Alexander Hamilton, Charles Willson Peale, and Benjamin Henry Latrobe.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Petticord, Michael. "The Fire at Elk Landing." Cecil Historical Journal, 2 (Winter 2001-2002):13-17.
Petticord, Michael. "Franklin Hall, Chesapeake City, MD." Peninsula Pacemaker, 30(March 2001): 30.