Search

1-18 of 18 results
Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
McDaniel, George William. Preserving the People's History: Traditional Black Material Culture in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Southern Maryland. Ph.D. diss., Duke University, 1979.
Walsh, Lorena S. Charles County, Maryland, 1658-1705: A Study of Chesapeake Social and Political Structure. Ph.D. diss., Michigan State University, 1977.
Atrim, Shane. "A Blue Dog Night?" Maryland 27 (July/August 1995): [39].
Butruille, Susan G. "Waldorf." Maryland 16 (Winter 1983): 36-40.
Dessaint, A. Y. Southern Maryland Yesterday and Today: Crab Pots and Sotweed Fields. Prince Frederick, MD: Calvert County Historical Society, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: Historic photographs and excerpts from 60 of the "best" works on Southern Maryland. Arranged predominately by theme, the chapters include working the land, working the water, life in the home, and life in the community. A ten page introduction gives a brief chronological history of the area.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Johnson, Paula J. Working the Water: The Commercial Fisheries of Maryland's Patuxent River. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: Johnson's book covers many of the fishing techniques and inventions which have so strongly impacted Chesapeake Bay's natural resources.
Lee, Jean B. The Price of Nationhood: The American Revolution in Charles County. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1994.
Annotation / Notes: This intensive and insightful study of a single county offers insight into several large themes in Maryland history - "the American Revolution as a transforming, ongoing phenomenon, civilian's responses to the War for Independence, the tenor of the nation's formative years, and the nature of Chesapeake society." During this period Charles Country changed from prosperous economy, securely connected to the outside world through overseas trade, into a stagnant backwater, whose forward looking population searched for opportunity elsewhere. Unlike other areas of Maryland, where the Revolutionary years were tumultuous, there were few challenges to the status quo. Cut off from the empire, entrepreneurial whites left the county in search of wealth and opportunity, often as close as Washington, DC, and the population became overwhelmingly unfree.
Harte, Thomas J. "Social Origins of the Brandywine Population." Phylon 24 (1963): 369-378.
Annotation / Notes: Harte seeks to establish the eighteenth-century origins of a distinctive mixed race "Brandywine" population in Charles County, though he fails to explain this social identity for the general reader. He points to Maryland laws against miscegenation and cross-racial sexual relationships as indirect evidence that both had occurred in the colony and cites Charles County records for violations of those laws. The article provides less direct support for his contention that Native American ancestry may also have been involved in the mixed race unions. Harte concludes that isolated family groupings in the eighteenth century served as the basis of the identifiable Brandywine population in the county in the nineteenth century.
Klapthor, Margaret Brown. "Neighbor Washington." The Record 27 (February 1983): 1-4.
Annotation / Notes: George Washington's association with Charles County.
Walsh, Lorena S. "The Historian as Census Taker: Individual Reconstitution and the Reconstruction of Censuses for a Colonial Chesapeake County." William and Mary Quarterly 3rd series, 38 (April 1981): 242-60.
Annotation / Notes: Walsh uses methods drawn from community studies to reconstitute a census for adult white males in Charles County in 1705, based upon a provincial census and rent rolls from the period. She argues that such methods provide the researcher the opportunity to establish reasonable accurate profiles of Chesapeake society in the colonial period.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Staying Put or Getting Out: Findings for Charles County, Maryland, 1650-1720." William and Mary Quarterly (3d. series), 44 (January 1987): 89-103.
Camp, Sharon Lee. Modernization: Threat to Community Politics. Political Intermediaries in Charles County, Maryland. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1977.
Scott-Childress, Reynolds J. "From 'Nature's Nation' to 'Washington's Playground': Marshall Hall, Middle-Class Culture, and the Commercialization of Leisure, 1865-1900." Maryland Historical Magazine, 105 (Fall 2010): 239-71.
Heubeck, Elizabeth. "Happy Trail: Bucolic Biking in Indian Head." Maryland Life, 7 (September/October 2011): 88-89, 101.
Peden, Henry C., Jr., and Veronica Clarke Peden. Charles County, Maryland: Marriage References and Family Relationships, 1658-1800. Lewes, DE: Colonial Roots, 2013.
Phillips, Richard Hayes. White Slave Children of Charles County, Maryland: The Search for Survivors. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 2015.