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Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
Cronin, William B. "Broomes Island." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 17 (September 1987): 60-62.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Manchester, Andi. "Solomon's Island." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 21 (July 1991): 32-37.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Vogt, Peter R. "Southern Maryland in Deep Time; A Brief History of our Geology, Part II: The Post-Breakup Sediment Wedge." Bugeye Times 23 (Spring 1998): 1, 6-7.
Vogt, Peter R. "Annual Report for 1990." Bugeye Times 16 (Spring 1991): 5-14.
Annotation / Notes: Calvert Marine Museum.
Berry, Paul L. "CMM Broadens its Horizons: Estuarine Biology on Display." Bugeye Times 20 (Fall 1995): 1, 6.
Berry, Paul L. "Twenty-Five Years of Local and Maritime History at CMM." Bugeye Times 20 (Summer 1995): 1, 6-7.
Dessaint, Alain. Southern Maryland Directory: A Guide to Researching the Region's Past. Prince Frederick, MD: Southern Maryland Today, 1983.
Gelbert, Doug. Company Museums, Industry Museums, and Industrial Tours: A Guidebook of Sites in the United States That Are Open to the Public. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 1994. 94-104.
Annotation / Notes: Brief descriptions of fifteen industrial sites in Maryland. When considering sites on this topic most museum goers would probably know of the Baltimore Museum of Industry but people may overlook many of the other sites covered, such as the Ocean City Lifesaving Station Museum, the Poultry Hall of Fame, and the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Visitor Center.
Wennersten, John R. "The Calvert Marine Museum." Maryland 17 (Summer 1985): 35-38.
Gibb, James G., and Julia A. King. "Gender, Activity Areas, and Homelots in the 17th-Century Chesapeake Region." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 109-131.
Annotation / Notes: Using archaeological records and spatial analysis from three Southern Maryland tobacco plantation sites, the authors provide an ethnographic look at life for seventeenth-century Maryland colonists in terms of gender and class roles. The article provides a brief overview of the economics of the Chesapeake region, the structure of living arrangements, and the gendered nature of tasks. The evidence suggests how gendered and class-based activities contributed to both household production and accrued wealth. The authors conclude that comparisons between the three sites provide the basis for understanding how household wealth was a direct corollary of the ability to secure a large work force and to develop a high degree of specialization.
Reichardt, Charles E. Drum Point Light and Along the American Coasts. N.p.: Published by the author, c. 1976.
Tigner, James J. Memories of Chesapeake Beach and North Beach. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2007.
Tigner, James J. "Calvert Marine Museum Tracks Invaders." Bugeye Times, 33 (Winter 2008-2009): 1, 6-7.
Hurry, Robert J. "'You Belong in a Cruise Along': The Story Continues." Bugeye Times, 33 (Spring 2008): 1, 6-7.