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Middleton, Authur Pierce. Tobacco Coast: A Maritime History of the Chesapeake Bay in the Colonial Era. Newport News, VA: Mariners Museum, 1953.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The author explores how free populations in Maryland - both black and white - challenged the notion of a slave society. The free black population, very much interconnected with the slave population in terms of kinship ties, also provided a threat to the underpinnings of the system. Once freedom arrived, social relationships also had to be redefined. The author writes that "free blacks did not occupy a unique or legitimate place within Maryland society, but instead formed an anomalous adjunct to the slave population" (3). By 1840, free blacks in Maryland composed 41% of the total black population of the state, or the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Carr, Lois Green. "The Metropolis of Maryland': A Comment on Town Development Along the Tobacco Coast." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Summer 1974): 124-45.
Annotation / Notes: Many towns in the Chesapeake area failed during the seventeenth century. Towns were not needed as commercial centers for the tobacco trade, the major economy of the area at that time. Carr uses St. Mary's City as an example of such a failure.
Chesser, Helen Brown. "St. George Island Memories." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 98-104.
Annotation / Notes: The memories of a woman who grew up on the Island during the early decades of the twentieth century.
Colbert, Judy. Country Towns of Maryland & Delaware: Charming Small Towns and Villages to Explore. Lincolnwood, IL: Country Roads Press, 1999.
Perdue, Lewis. Country Inns Of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. Washington, DC: Washingtonian Books, 1977.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. Settlement, Community, and Economy: The Development of Towns in Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, 1660-1775. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Thomas argues that the seventeen clustered settlements that dotted the lower Eastern Shore actually functioned as towns. Although legislatively established they have been largely ignored in the history of the Chesapeake region. Most historians argue that the area was rural, when in fact its character was between urban and rural.
Warren, Marion E. Bringing Back the Bay: the Chesapeake in the photographs of Marion E. Warren and the voices of its people. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Modern photographs accompanied with oral history text. Of special interest is the "photographer's commentaries" on his work.
Wennersten, John R. Maryland's Eastern Shore: A Journey in Time and Place. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1992.
Annotation / Notes: Wennersten's goal is to make the reader understand the distinct society that is the eastern shore through discussion of the area's agricultural life, its race relations, and maritime society. Brief histories are given of some communities and mention made of some influential people.
White, Dan. Crosscurrents in Quiet Water: Portraits of the Chesapeake. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Co., 1987.
Annotation / Notes: A photo essay of the changing lives of the Eastern Shore's peoples focusing on watermen, boat builders, environmentalists, and chicken farmers. Special emphasis is placed on Smith Island and Crisfield. Photographs by Jon Naso and Marion Warren.
Brait, Susan. Chesapeake Gold: Man & Oyster on the Bay. Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky Press, 1990.
Burton, Bill. "Cold Fish, Ice Fish." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 23 (December 1993): 16, 38.
Lawson, Glenn. The Last Waterman: A True Story. Crisfield, MD: Crisfield Publishing Company, 1988.
Miller, Henry M. "Transforming a 'Splendid and Delightsome Land:' Colonists and Ecological Change in the Chesapeake, 1670 - 1820." Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences 76 (September 1986): 173-87.
Wharton, James. The Bounty of the Chesapeake. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1953.
Annotation / Notes: Wharton's little book is one of the most accessible assemblages of references to Bay resources in the seventeenth and eighteenth century.
Gelbert, Doug. Company Museums, Industry Museums, and Industrial Tours: A Guidebook of Sites in the United States That Are Open to the Public. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 1994. 94-104.
Annotation / Notes: Brief descriptions of fifteen industrial sites in Maryland. When considering sites on this topic most museum goers would probably know of the Baltimore Museum of Industry but people may overlook many of the other sites covered, such as the Ocean City Lifesaving Station Museum, the Poultry Hall of Fame, and the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Visitor Center.
Hollowak, Thomas L. "Maryland Genealogy and Family History: A Bibliography, 1987-1989." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 33 (Summer 1992): 484-530.
Locke, Diana. Oyster Fisheries Management of Maryland's Chesapeake Bay. Ph.D. diss., Walden University, 1998.
Ackerman, Eric G. "Economic Means Index: A Measure of Social Status in the Chesapeake, 1690-1815." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 26-36.
Carr, Lois Green. "Emigration and the Standard of Living: The Seventeenth Century Chesapeake." Journal of Economic History 52 (June 1992): 271-91.
Annotation / Notes: Carr contends that the experience of moving from England to the Chesapeake region of America in the seventeenth century was not simply a change of homeland, but a drastic change in lifestyle. She evaluates such factors as marriage, birth rates, life expectancy, diet, housing, working conditions and social freedoms for the English who chose to emigrate to America in that first century. Carr argues that, with the exception of diet, the standard of living may have been higher had the colonists remained in England, but in terms of economic independence and some degree of political participation, their prospects in the New World were superior.
Ernst, Joseph A., and H. Roy. Merrens. "'Camden's Turrets Pierce the Skies!': the Urban Process in the Southern Colonies During the Eighteenth Century." William and Mary Quarterly 30 (1973): 549-574.
Annotation / Notes: The authors advance the case that the conventional view that Southern colonies were devoid of urbanization derives from a confusion of form and function, as well as size and significance. The article presents case studies of Camden, South Carolina, and Cross Creek, North Carolina, as well as examples from Virginia and Maryland, to demonstrate that towns often played an important urban function in the economy of the Southern colonies, though their examples are hardly convincing in contradicting the prevailing interpretation.