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Johansen, Mary Carroll. "'Intelligence, Though Overlooked:' Education for Black Women in the Upper South, 1800-1840." Maryland Historical Magazine 93 (Winter 1998): 443-65.
Annotation / Notes: Black and white educators established forty-six schools for free black children in the early nineteenth century. These educators supported education for black women believing that women transmitted knowledge and morals, thus shaping a generation of virtuous citizens. In addition, educators looked to education as a means by which to form self-sufficient and industrious free black communities.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Garrigus, Carl E., Jr. "The Reading Habits of Maryland's Planter Gentry, 1718-1747." Maryland Historical Magazine 92 (Spring 1997): 36-53.
Annotation / Notes: Studies of reading habits have enjoyed a renaissance in recent years, and this article builds on pioneering research in the 1930s of Joseph Towne Wheeler in analyzing the contents of colonial Maryland bookshelves. The change in reading preferences that occurred in the later eighteenth century brought much greater diversity to personal libraries that formerly were dominated by devotional, legal and classical titles. There also is evidence that reading before 1750 was more intensive, that is, readers tended to return to the same text or passage for repeated readings. This, coupled with the expense of purchasing and importing books, helps explain the relative paucity of published works owned by the literate elite in colonial Maryland.
Garrigus, Carl E., Jr. "Maryland Bibliography: 1952." Maryland Historical Magazine 48 (March 1953): 53-64.
Johansen, Mary Carroll. 'Female Instruction and Improvement': Education for Women in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, 1785-1835. Ph.D. diss., College of William and Mary, 1996.
Laskey, Concetta. "Using the Chestory Archive to Teach the Chesapeake." Bugeye Times, 38 (Spring 2013): 1-3.