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Johansen, Mary Carroll. "'Intelligence, Though Overlooked:' Education for Black Women in the Upper South, 1800-1840." Maryland Historical Magazine 93 (Winter 1998): 443-65.
Annotation / Notes: Black and white educators established forty-six schools for free black children in the early nineteenth century. These educators supported education for black women believing that women transmitted knowledge and morals, thus shaping a generation of virtuous citizens. In addition, educators looked to education as a means by which to form self-sufficient and industrious free black communities.
Chesser, Helen Brown. "St. George Island Memories." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 98-104.
Annotation / Notes: The memories of a woman who grew up on the Island during the early decades of the twentieth century.
Lumpkins, Maggie Henderson. "Memories of St. George Island." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 104-6.
Gibb, James G., and Julia A. King. "Gender, Activity Areas, and Homelots in the 17th-Century Chesapeake Region." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 109-131.
Annotation / Notes: Using archaeological records and spatial analysis from three Southern Maryland tobacco plantation sites, the authors provide an ethnographic look at life for seventeenth-century Maryland colonists in terms of gender and class roles. The article provides a brief overview of the economics of the Chesapeake region, the structure of living arrangements, and the gendered nature of tasks. The evidence suggests how gendered and class-based activities contributed to both household production and accrued wealth. The authors conclude that comparisons between the three sites provide the basis for understanding how household wealth was a direct corollary of the ability to secure a large work force and to develop a high degree of specialization.
Bellinger, Annie. "Marylanders Through and Through." Maryland 25 (December 1993): 88.
Bradshaw, Alice. "Waterman's Wife." Annapolitan 7 (March 1993): 28-32, 34-35, 49.
Chappell, Helen. "Shorewomen." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 23 (December 1993): 30-34.
Johansen, Mary Carroll. 'Female Instruction and Improvement': Education for Women in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, 1785-1835. Ph.D. diss., College of William and Mary, 1996.
Line, Lila. Waterwomen. Queenstown, MD: Queen Anne Press, 1982.
Robson, Nancy Taylor. Woman in the Wheelhouse. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1985.
Brown, Kathleen M. Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs:Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1996.
Hobgood-Oster, Laura. She Glanceth from Earth to Heaven: The Phenomenon of Love Mysticism Among Women in AntebellumVirginia and Maryland. New Orleans: University Press of the South, 1998.
Jensen, Joan M. Loosening the Bonds: Mid-Atlantic Farm Women, 1750-1850. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986.
Jensen, Joan M. "'You May Depend She Does Not Eat Much Idle Bread': Mid-Atlantic Farm Women and Their Historians." Agricultural History 61 (1987): 29-46.
Norton, Mary Beth. Founding Mothers and Fathers: Gendered Power and the Forming of American Society. New York: Knopf, 1996.
Treckel, Paula A. To Comfort the Heart: Women in Seventeenth Century America. American Women, 1600-1900. New York: Twayne, 1996.
Gibbs, M.J. "Precioius Artifacts: Women's Jewelry in the Chesapeake, 1750-1799." Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts, 13 (1987): 52-103.
Pelzer, John D., and Linda C. "The French Lady." Civil War Times Illustrated, 31 (May/June 1992): 28-31, 66-67.
Allen, Gloria Seaman. "Gender Division in Handweaving on Chesapeake Plantations." Proceedings of the Textile History Forum, (2002): 31-46.
Meacham, Sarah Hand. "'They Will Be Adjudged by Their Drink, What Kinde of Housewives They Are': Gender, Technology, and Household Cidering in England and the Chesapeake, 1690-1760." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 111 (no. 2, 2003): 117-50.
Fawver, Kathleen. "Gender and the Structure of Planter Households in the Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake: Harford County, Maryland, in 1776." Early American Studies, 4 (Fall 2006): 442-70.
Meacham, Sarah Hand. Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake. Early America: History, Context, Culture Series. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.
Clifford, Mary Louise, and J. Candace Clifford. "Female Light Keepers on the Chesapeake Bay." Shoreline, 16 (June 2009): 9-13.
Parks, Don. Chesapeake Women: their stories, their memories. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Pub. Ltd., 2014.
Silver, Alexa B. "A Prickly Pairing: Mistresses and Maidservants in the Colonial Chesapeake." Maryland Historical Magazine, 112 (Spring/Summer 2017):102-15.