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Billingsley, Andrew. "Family Reunion-The Legacy of Robert Smalls: Civil War Hero." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1993): 14-17.
Blackburn, George M., ed. "The Negro as Viewed by a Michigan Civil War Soldier: Letters of John C. Buchanan." Michigan History 47 (1963): 75-84.
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Callum, Agnes Kane. 9th Regiment Colored Troops: Volunteers of Maryland, Civil War, 1863-1866. Baltimore: Mullac Publishers, 1999.
Callum, Agnes K. Colored Volunteers of Maryland, Civil War, 7th Regiment, United States Colored Troops, 1863-1866. Baltimore: Mullac Publishers, 1990.
Zubritsky, John. Fighting Men: A Chronicle of Three Black Civil War Soldiers. Upland, PA: Diane Publishing Company, 1997.
Worden, Amy. "Baltimore Civil War Depot to be Restored." Historic Preservation News 31 (April 1991): 17.
Gilmor, Harry. Four Years in the Saddle. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1866.
Anderson, George M. "The Civil War Courtship of Richard Mortimer Williams and Rose Anderson of Rockville." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 119-138.
Annotation / Notes: The story of the couple's courtship taken from Williams's writings. Insight is offered into life in Rockville, the county seat, during that period.
Pruzan, Jeffrey S. "Shadows of Civil War Baltimore." Civil War Times Illustrated 35 (September/October 1995): 24-27, 69-72.
Sheads, Scott Sumter, and Daniel Carroll Toomey. Baltimore During the Civil War. Linthicum, MD: Toomey Press, 1997.
Smart, Jeffery K. "Burning Bridges: The Events Leading Up to the Military Occupation of Harford County in 1861." Harford Historical Bulletin 72 (Spring 1997): 9-56.
Strain, Paula M. The Blue Hills of Maryland: History Along the Appalachian Trail on South Mountain and the Catoctins. Vienna, VA: Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, 1993.
Annotation / Notes: Strain states that the Maryland portion of the Appalachian Trail has more history than any other part of the path. She presents this history as one would encounter it along the trail, heading north from Harpers Ferry to Pennsylvania. A great deal of this history relates to the Civil War. She also tells the history of the Trail itself.
Bernard, Kenneth A. "Lincoln and the Music of the Civil War." Lincoln Herald 66 (1964): 115-134.
Hartwig, D. Scott. The Battle of Antietam and the Maryland Campaign of 1862: A Bibliography. Westport, CT: Meckler Books, 1990.
Hartwig, D. Scott. "Maryland's Best Kept Humanities Secrets: Civil War Museums and Sites in Maryland." Maryland Humanities (Spring 1998): 27.
Barton, Donald Scott. Divided Houses: The Civil War Party System in the Border States. Ph.D. diss., Texas A&M University, 1991.
Catton, Bruce. "A Southern Artist on the Civil War." American Heritage 9 (1958): 117-120.
Towers, Frank, ed. "Military Waif: A Sidelight on the Baltimore Riot of 19 April 1861." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Winter 1994): 427-46.
Henig, Gerald S. Henry Winter Davis: Antebellum and Civil War Congressman from Maryland. New York: Twayne Press, 1973.
Annotation / Notes: A sympathetic biography of a leading Maryland politician who died in 1866 at the early age of forty-eight. A gifted orator and political writer, and a passionate opponent of the Democratic Party, Davis initially associated with the Whig Party, which was popular in the north but less so in the south, just as it was in the throes of disintegration. He then aligned with the newly formed Know Nothing Party, whose primary appeal was nativism and anti-Catholicism, and was elected to Congress in 1855. He was a leading opponent of the Buchanan administration and an early supporter of Abraham Lincoln. Active in trying to stem the tide of secession and to keep Maryland in the Union, he hoped for a Cabinet position, but Montgomery Blair won the appointment. At odds with his constituents, he was defeated for re-election and his political career appeared to be ended. He became gradually disenchanted with Lincoln's leadership, and, after re-election to Congress as a Unconditional Unionist, he led the effort to reassert Congressional leadership over reconstruction policies. When the President pocket-vetoed the Wade-Davis bill, he issued a highly publicized protest manifesto and actively opposed Lincoln's renomination. During the 1864 campaign, however, he decided that the Democratic candidate, McClellan, was a greater threat, so he campaigned for the Republican ticket. Davis also played a decisive role in the writing and ratification of the Maryland constitution of 1864. Once again his radical position eroded his constituent base and he was not renominated for his Congressional seat.
Jacobs, Charles T. "Civil War Fords and Ferries in Montgomery County." Montgomery County Story 40 (February 1997): 417-28.
Summers, Festus P. The Baltimore and Ohio in the Civil War. New York: Putnam's, 1939.
Annotation / Notes: The B&O was the Union's most important railroad during the conflict. Summers's book "presents a scholarly, objective, and conscientious approach to the subject in hand with literary execution of unusual excellence," said Maryland historian Matthew Page Andrews in his 1940 Maryland Historical Magazine review.
Addison-Darneille, and Henrietta Stockton. "For Better or For Worse." Civil War Times Illustrated 31 (May/June 1992): 32-35, 73.
Cale, Clyde C., Jr. "Maria Louise Browning: Civil War Heroine." Glades Star 9 (March 1999): 11-13, 39.