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Betterly, Richard. "Seize Mr. Lincoln." Civil War Times Illustrated 25 (February 1987): 14-21.
Annotation / Notes: 1861 Baltimore plot.
Marks, Bayly Ellen, and Mark Norton Schatz, eds. Between North and South, A Maryland Journalist Views the Civil War: The Narrative of William Wilkins Glenn, 1861-1869. Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1976.
Worden, Amy. "Baltimore Civil War Depot to be Restored." Historic Preservation News 31 (April 1991): 17.
Pruzan, Jeffrey S. "Shadows of Civil War Baltimore." Civil War Times Illustrated 35 (September/October 1995): 24-27, 69-72.
Sheads, Scott Sumter, and Daniel Carroll Toomey. Baltimore During the Civil War. Linthicum, MD: Toomey Press, 1997.
Sheads, Scott Sumter, and Daniel Carroll Toomey. "Maryland's Best Kept Humanities Secrets: Civil War Museums and Sites in Maryland." Maryland Humanities (Spring 1998): 27.
Towers, Frank, ed. "Military Waif: A Sidelight on the Baltimore Riot of 19 April 1861." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Winter 1994): 427-46.
Henig, Gerald S. Henry Winter Davis: Antebellum and Civil War Congressman from Maryland. New York: Twayne Press, 1973.
Annotation / Notes: A sympathetic biography of a leading Maryland politician who died in 1866 at the early age of forty-eight. A gifted orator and political writer, and a passionate opponent of the Democratic Party, Davis initially associated with the Whig Party, which was popular in the north but less so in the south, just as it was in the throes of disintegration. He then aligned with the newly formed Know Nothing Party, whose primary appeal was nativism and anti-Catholicism, and was elected to Congress in 1855. He was a leading opponent of the Buchanan administration and an early supporter of Abraham Lincoln. Active in trying to stem the tide of secession and to keep Maryland in the Union, he hoped for a Cabinet position, but Montgomery Blair won the appointment. At odds with his constituents, he was defeated for re-election and his political career appeared to be ended. He became gradually disenchanted with Lincoln's leadership, and, after re-election to Congress as a Unconditional Unionist, he led the effort to reassert Congressional leadership over reconstruction policies. When the President pocket-vetoed the Wade-Davis bill, he issued a highly publicized protest manifesto and actively opposed Lincoln's renomination. During the 1864 campaign, however, he decided that the Democratic candidate, McClellan, was a greater threat, so he campaigned for the Republican ticket. Davis also played a decisive role in the writing and ratification of the Maryland constitution of 1864. Once again his radical position eroded his constituent base and he was not renominated for his Congressional seat.
Addison-Darneille, and Henrietta Stockton. "For Better or For Worse." Civil War Times Illustrated 31 (May/June 1992): 32-35, 73.
Hall, James O. "Butler Takes Baltimore." Civil War Times Illustrated 17 (1978): 4-10, 44-46.
Towers, Frank. "Job Busting at Baltimore Shipyards: Racial Violence in the Civil War-era South." Journal of Southern History 66 (May 2000): 221-56.
Chrismer, James. "Above and Beyond: The Civil War Careers of Alfred B. Hilton and Charles E. Phelps." Harford Historical Bulletin, 86 (Fall 2000): 3-60.
Chrismer, James. "MHS Assumes Leadership of Baltimore Civil War Museum." MHS/News, (January-March 2001): 4-5.
Hagaman, Robert A. Personal Battles: The Lives of Maryland's Black Civil War Veterans, 1840-1920. Ph.D. diss., Northern Illinois University, 2004.
Towers, Frank. "'A Vociferous Army of Howling Wolves': Baltimore's Civil War Riot of April 19, 1861." Maryland Historian, 23 (Fall/Winter 1992): 1-27.
Michel, Robert E. Colonel Harry Gilmor's Raid Around Baltimore July 10th to 13th, 1864. Baltimore: Erbe Publishers, 1976.
Gaede, Frederick. "Military Prisoners in the Baltimore City Jail, 1864." Maryland Historical Magazine, 89 (Winter 1994): 467-68.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "A Wounded Confederate Soldier's Letter from Fort McHenry." Maryland Historical Magazine, 73 (December 1978): 394-96.
Holzer, Harold. "Incognito in Baltimore." Civil War Times, 47 (December 2008): 36-41.
Everett, Edward G. "The Baltimore Riots, April 1861." Pennsylvania History, 24 (October 1957): 331-42.
Fein, Isaac F. "Baltimore Jews During the Civil War." American Jewish Historical Quarterly, 51 (December 1961): 67-96.
Ezratty, Harry A. Baltimore in the Civil War: the Pratt Street riot and a city occupied. Charleston, SC: History Press, 2010.
Serpick, Evan, ed. "Baltimore and the Civil War." Baltimore, 104 (April 2011): 129-43.
White, Jonathan. "Forty-Seven Eyewitness Accounts of the Pratt Street Riot and Its Aftermath." Maryland Historical Magazine, 106 (Spring 2011): 70-94.
Williams, Michael G. "Bullets vs. Bricks in Baltimore." Civil War Times, 50 (October 2011): 34-41.