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Callcott, Margaret Law. "Slave and Slave Families at Riversdale." Riversdale Letter 13 (Fall 1996): 2-5.
Callcott, Margaret Law. "Slave Housing at Riversdale." Riversdale Letter 11 (Fall 1994): 2-4.
Callum, Agnes Kane. "Free Blacks of St. Mary's County, Maryland - 1800." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 22 (Spring 1981): 144-46.
Campbell, Penelope. "Some Notes on Frederick County's Participation in the Maryland Colonization Scheme." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 51-59.
Clarke, Nina H., and Lillian B. Brown. History of the Black Public Schools of Montgomery County, Maryland 1872-1961. New York: Vantage Press, 1978.
Clayton, Ralph. Black Baltimore, 1820-1870. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1988.
Clayton, Ralph. Free Blacks of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1987.
Clayton, Ralph. Slavery, Slaveholding and the Free Black Population of Antebellum Baltimore. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1993.
Coates, James Roland, Jr. Recreation and Sport in the African-American Community of Baltimore, 1890-1920. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Cochran, Matthew D. "Hoodoo's Fire: Interpreting Nineteenth Century African American Material Culture at the Brice House, Annapolis, Maryland." Maryland Archeology 35 (March 1999): 25-33.
Cohen, Anthony. The Underground Railroad in Montgomery County, Maryland. Rockville, MD: Montgomery County Historical Society, 1994.
Cohen, Anthony M. "The Underground Railroad in Montgomery County." Montgomery County Story 38 (February 1995): 321-32.
Cornelison, Alice. "History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 10 (Summer-Fall 1989): 117-19.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Davidson, Thomas E. "Free Blacks in Old Somerset County, 1745-1755." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 151-156.
Annotation / Notes: County court records of Somerset County, Maryland during the eighteenth century are particularly complete, allowing for detailed studies of the county's population during that period. The author contributes to the scholarship which, up until 1985, focused primarily on the origins of black culture on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in the seventeenth century. The author also adds to the growing scholarship on free blacks in this region, which tended to also focus on the seventeenth century. In addition to examining court records to determine the numbers of free Negroes and mulattoes, the author also attempts to determine how members of these populations obtained their free status, that is, through manumission or the as the result of being children of free mothers (free-born).
Davis, A. Vernon. "The Local Scene." Maryland Cracker Barrel 19 (January 1990): 3-5.
Annotation / Notes: Fort Frederick and the Williams Family.
Della, M. Ray, Jr. "An Analysis of Baltimore's Population in the 1850's." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 20-35.
Dessaint, A. Y. "Black Culture in Early 20th-Century Calvert County." Calvert County Historical Society News and Notes 2 (October 1983): 10-19.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Diggs, Louis S. "Emory Grove: A Black Community of Yesteryear." Montgomery County Story 31 (February 1988): 1-10.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The author explores how free populations in Maryland - both black and white - challenged the notion of a slave society. The free black population, very much interconnected with the slave population in terms of kinship ties, also provided a threat to the underpinnings of the system. Once freedom arrived, social relationships also had to be redefined. The author writes that "free blacks did not occupy a unique or legitimate place within Maryland society, but instead formed an anomalous adjunct to the slave population" (3). By 1840, free blacks in Maryland composed 41% of the total black population of the state, or the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "The Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People, 1864-1870." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 369-404.
Annotation / Notes: In 1864, Baltimore businessmen, lawyers and clergymen formed the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People. Many of these men had been associated with emancipation causes. These men coordinated the flow of money and supplies provided by the Freedmen's Bureau. Eventually, the schools founded by the Association were taken over by the state, which had initially not provided for free, public Negro education at all.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Greene, Carroll, Jr. "Summertime in the Highland Beach Tradition." American Visions 1 (May/June 1986): 46-50.