Search

1-25 of 371 results
Anderson, George M., S. J. "Growing Sugar Cane in Montgomery County: A Mid-Nineteenth-Century Experiment by James W. Anderson." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Summer 1984): 134-41.
Cunningham, Isabel Shipley. "Anne Arundel's Famous Green-Meat Cantaloupes." Anne Arundel County History Notes 27 (July 1996): 3-4, 8-10.
McCauley, Donald. The Limits of Change in the Tobacco South: An Economic and Social Analysis of Prince George's County, Maryland, 1840-1860. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1973.
McCauley, Donald. "The Urban Impact on Agricultural Land Use: Farm Patterns in Prince George's County, Maryland 1860-1880." Law, Society, and Politics in Early Maryland. Edited by Aubrey C. Land, Lois Green Carr, and Edward C. Papenfuse, 228-47. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.
McGrain, John. An Agricultural History of Baltimore County, Maryland. Towson, MD: published by the author, 1990.
McGrath, Sally V., and Patricia J. McGuire, eds. The Money Crop: Tobacco Culture in Calvert County, Maryland. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical and Cultural Publications, 1992.
Middleton, Authur Pierce. Tobacco Coast: A Maritime History of the Chesapeake Bay in the Colonial Era. Newport News, VA: Mariners Museum, 1953.
Miller, Arlene K. "Cecil County Fair." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 61 (April 1992): 6-7.
Mumford, Willard R. Strawberries, Peas & Beans: Truck Farming in Anne Arundel County. Linthicum, MD: Ann Arundel County Historical Society, 2000.
Pittman, LaVern. "Walnut Level: A Model Farm in Allegany County." Journal of the Alleghenies 30 (1994): 3-12.
Thomas, Calvin Rutherford. The Impact of Amenity Landownership on Agriculture in Talbot County, Md. Ph.D. diss., University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1983.
Trimble, Logan C. "Middling Planters and the Strategy of Diversification in Baltimore County, Maryland, 1750-1776." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (Summer 1990): 171-78.
Walsh, Jim. "Barrels for a 'Middling Planter' in Colonial Prince George's County." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 25 (August/September 1997): 2-4.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
Cameron, Roldah N. "Levi Oldham Cameron: Cecil County Builder & Politician." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 67 (April 1994): 4-5.
Callcott, Margaret Law. "Inventory of a Maryland Slave Cabin." Riversdale Letter 12 (Spring 1995): 2-4.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The author explores how free populations in Maryland - both black and white - challenged the notion of a slave society. The free black population, very much interconnected with the slave population in terms of kinship ties, also provided a threat to the underpinnings of the system. Once freedom arrived, social relationships also had to be redefined. The author writes that "free blacks did not occupy a unique or legitimate place within Maryland society, but instead formed an anomalous adjunct to the slave population" (3). By 1840, free blacks in Maryland composed 41% of the total black population of the state, or the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Ware, Donna M. Green Glades & Sooty Gob Piles: The Maryland Coal Region's Industrial and Architectural Past. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical and Cultural Publications, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Some 6,000 bridges, iron furnaces, log schoolhouses, company offices and stores, miner's houses, mill buildings, banks, churches, mansions, inns, resort cottages, and other structures associated with the extractive, manufacturing, and transportation industries of Garrett and western Allegany counties are surveyed and described here, with photographs, and contributions by Orlando Ridout, V, Geoffey B. Henry, and Mark R. Edwards. The largest project to date conducted by the Maryland Historical Trust is essential to an understanding of the unique remains of Maryland's historic resort area and coal and iron district.
Anderton, Esther. "Application for Distillers' Licenses 1798-1801." Anne Arundel Speaks 4 (September 1978): 4-5; (December 1978): 3-4.
Armstrong, Kimberly. "Vindex: A Maryland Ghost Town." Journal of the Alleghenies 31 (1995): 119-24.
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Neighborhood and City Hall: The Origins of Neighborhood Associations in Baltimore, 1880-1911." Journal of Urban History 6 (November 1979): 3-30.
Barnett, Todd H. "Tobacco, Planters, Tenants, and Slaves: A Portrait of Montgomery County in 1783." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Summer 1994): 184-203.
Annotation / Notes: Using the Maryland State Assessment of 1783, this study evaluates the condition of the Montgomery County community. Montgomery was the western most of Maryland's tobacco counties. This economy left Montgomery with exhausted farmland, as well as a poor, landless, and unstable population. Comparison is made with Frederick where the soil was essentially the same but had not been damaged by tobacco farming.