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Banks, Theresa Douglas. The Development of Public Education for the Negro in Prince George's County (1872-1946). M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1948.
Brown, Philip L. A Century of 'Separate But Equal' Education in Anne Arundel County. New York: Vantage Press, 1987.
Clarke, Nina H., and Lillian B. Brown. History of the Black Public Schools of Montgomery County, Maryland 1872-1961. New York: Vantage Press, 1978.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "The Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People, 1864-1870." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 369-404.
Annotation / Notes: In 1864, Baltimore businessmen, lawyers and clergymen formed the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People. Many of these men had been associated with emancipation causes. These men coordinated the flow of money and supplies provided by the Freedmen's Bureau. Eventually, the schools founded by the Association were taken over by the state, which had initially not provided for free, public Negro education at all.
Jenkins, David S. A History of Colored Schools in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and a Proposal for their Consolidation. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1942.
Johansen, Mary Carroll. "'Intelligence, Though Overlooked:' Education for Black Women in the Upper South, 1800-1840." Maryland Historical Magazine 93 (Winter 1998): 443-65.
Annotation / Notes: Black and white educators established forty-six schools for free black children in the early nineteenth century. These educators supported education for black women believing that women transmitted knowledge and morals, thus shaping a generation of virtuous citizens. In addition, educators looked to education as a means by which to form self-sufficient and industrious free black communities.
Andrews, Andrea. "The Baltimore School Building Program, 1870-1900: A Study in Urban Reform." Maryland Historical Magazine 70 (Fall 1975): 260-274.
Booth, Oscar. "Annapolis in Fiction." Anne Arundel County History Notes 26 (January 1995): 1-2.
Brooks, Richard O. New Towns and Communal Values: A Case Study of Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: This work is the product of the consultancy year the author spent with the Rouse Company. He includes a snapshot of residents at the time, such as their population characteristics and their reason for purchasing in Columbia. Included is a chapter on the now gone Antioch College.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.
Crowley, C. H. "Birthday by the Bay." Saturday Evening Post 267 (March/April 1995): 80-81.
Davis, A. Vernon. "The Local Scene." Cracker Barrel 18 (August 1988): 3, 5-7.
Annotation / Notes: Smithsburg.
Dombrowski, Esther. "The Homefront: Harford County During World War II, Part I." Harford Historical Bulletin 65 (Summer 1995): 107-52; "Part II."Harford Historical Bulletin 66 (Fall 1995): 155-204.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Centerville." Frederick Magazine (July 1992): 14, 22.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Foxville." Frederick Magazine (September 1991): 18, 57.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Harmony Grove." Frederick Magazine (June 1991): 19, 59.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Hopehill." Frederick Magazine (February 1993): 12-13.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Lander." Frederick Magazine (November 1992): 11-12.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Living in Harmony." Frederick Magazine (October 1994): 57.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Middletown." Frederick Magazine (May 1992): 12-14.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Pleasant View." Frederick Magazine (February 1991): 9-10.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Sabillasville." Frederick Magazine (July 1990): 11-12.