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Handwerker, Tom. "Something is Fishy Down on the Farm." Heartland of Del-Mar-Va 13 (Harvest 1991): 18-19.
Kent, George Robert. The Negro in Politics in Dorchester County, Maryland, 1920-1960. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1961.
Levy, Peter B. "The Civil Rights Movement in Cambridge, Maryland, during the 1960s." Viet Nam Generation 6, nos. 3-4 (1995): 96-107.
Levy, Peter B. "Civil War on Race Street: The Black Freedom Struggle and White Resistance in Cambridge, Maryland, 1960-1964." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 290-318.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines Cambridge, Maryland in order to gain a local perspective on the civil rights movement. The author sets out to understand the movement at the grass roots level, instead of focusing on national leadership and civil rights legislation. Cambridge has been consistently overlooked in studies of the civil rights movement, and the author wonders if this has been the case since events in Cambridge do not fit neatly into typical historical narratives of the movement.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Millner, Sandra Y. "Recasting Civil Rights Leadership: Gloria Richardson and the Cambridge Movement." Journal of Black Studies 26 (July 1996): 668-87.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the neglect by scholars of civil rights leader Gloria Richardson. Richardson was not part of the established civil rights movement, nor has she been celebrated in the same manner as other civil rights leaders. The author examines the possible reasons for Richardson's marginalization in histories of the movement, which stem, in part, from scholars not questioning the language and the conceptions of gender and class used to describe Richardson in the press. Richardson also focused her attention on economic issues while the established civil rights leadership continued to focus on civil rights. She was also one of the first leaders to openly question the tactic on nonviolence. These additional factors also contributed to a lack of recognition of Richardson's role in the Cambridge Movement.
Millner, Sandra Y. "Selected Readings on Afro-Americans and Maryland's Eastern Shore." Maryland Pendulum 5 (Fall/Winter 1985): 6-7.
Thomas, Lamont D. "Paul Cuffe: Against the Odds in Vienna, Maryland." Log of Mystic Seaport 45, no. 4 (1994): 103-8.
Wilson, Emily Wanda. The Public Education of Negroes on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1948.
Weeks, Christopher, ed. Between the Nanticoke and the Choptank: An Architectural History of Dorchester County, Maryland. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Blake, Allison. The Chesapeake Bay Book: A Complete Guide. 3rd edition. Lee, MA: Berkshire House Publishers, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: A well researched tour guide for the general population.
Chappell, Helen. "Elliott Island." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 23 (August 1993): 27-33.
Cronin, William B. "Barren Island." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 18 (May 1988): 66-68.
Cronin, William B. "Sharps Island." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 18 (January 1989): 36-38.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Harp, David W., and Tom Horton. Water's Way: Life Along the Chesapeake. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A photo essay on the environmental plight of the Eastern Shore, special attention is paid to the area's natural history and the life of the watermen.
Johnson, James C. Dorchester County: A Pictorial History. Cambridge, MD: Western Publishing Co., 1976.
Jopp, Harold D. Rediscovery of the Eastern Shore: Delmarva Travelogues of the 1870s. Wye Mills, MD: Chesapeake College Press, 1986.
Annotation / Notes: Reprints of articles by four different authors which appeared in the leading nineteenth century publications of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Lippincott's Magazine, and Scribner's Monthly. The authors included noted illustrator Howard Pyle and Maryland writer George Townsend.
Meanley, Brooke. Blackwater: National Wildlife Refuge, Dorchester County, Maryland. Cambridge, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1978.
Mowbray, Calvin W., and Maurice D. Rimpu. Close-ups of Early Dorchester County History. Silver Spring, MD: Family Line, 1988.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.