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Kent, George Robert. The Negro in Politics in Dorchester County, Maryland, 1920-1960. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1961.
Levy, Peter B. "The Civil Rights Movement in Cambridge, Maryland, during the 1960s." Viet Nam Generation 6, nos. 3-4 (1995): 96-107.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Millner, Sandra Y. "Recasting Civil Rights Leadership: Gloria Richardson and the Cambridge Movement." Journal of Black Studies 26 (July 1996): 668-87.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the neglect by scholars of civil rights leader Gloria Richardson. Richardson was not part of the established civil rights movement, nor has she been celebrated in the same manner as other civil rights leaders. The author examines the possible reasons for Richardson's marginalization in histories of the movement, which stem, in part, from scholars not questioning the language and the conceptions of gender and class used to describe Richardson in the press. Richardson also focused her attention on economic issues while the established civil rights leadership continued to focus on civil rights. She was also one of the first leaders to openly question the tactic on nonviolence. These additional factors also contributed to a lack of recognition of Richardson's role in the Cambridge Movement.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. Settlement, Community, and Economy: The Development of Towns in Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, 1660-1775. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Thomas argues that the seventeen clustered settlements that dotted the lower Eastern Shore actually functioned as towns. Although legislatively established they have been largely ignored in the history of the Chesapeake region. Most historians argue that the area was rural, when in fact its character was between urban and rural.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. A Guide to Maryland State Archives Holdings of Dorchester County Records on Microfilm. Annapolis: Maryland State Archives, 1989.
Szabo, Peter S. "An Interview with Gloria Richardson Dandridge." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 347-58.
Mowbray, Calvin W., and Mary I. Mowbray. The Early Settlers of Dorchester County and Their Lands. 2 vols. N.p.: Privately printed, 1981.
Skinner, Vernon L., Jr. Abstracts of the Debt Books of the Provincial Land Office of Maryland, Dorchester County. 2 vols. Baltimore: Clearfield, 2016.