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McCauley, Donald. The Limits of Change in the Tobacco South: An Economic and Social Analysis of Prince George's County, Maryland, 1840-1860. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1973.
McCauley, Donald. "The Urban Impact on Agricultural Land Use: Farm Patterns in Prince George's County, Maryland 1860-1880." Law, Society, and Politics in Early Maryland. Edited by Aubrey C. Land, Lois Green Carr, and Edward C. Papenfuse, 228-47. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.
Stevenson, John A. "Plants, Problems, and Personalities: The Genesis of the Bureau of Plant Industry." Agricultural History 28 (1954): 155-162.
Annotation / Notes: Nearly as much a history of plant pathology in the U. S., this piece describes how Beverly T. Galloway conducted research that convinced politicians and farmers alike that germs caused diseases of animals and plants. Galloway succeeded in raising the status of plant research in the U. S. D. A. from a tiny office to the Bureau of Plant Industry in 1901, which became the nucleus for the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center.
Wiser, Vivian. The Movement for Agricultural Improvement in Maryland, 1785-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1963.
Cameron, Roldah N. "Levi Oldham Cameron: Cecil County Builder & Politician." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 67 (April 1994): 4-5.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. Power and Poverty: Theory and Practice. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Brackett, Jeffrey Richardson. The Negro in Maryland: A Study of the Institution of Slavery, extra vol. 6. Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 1889.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Burkhart, Lynne C. Old Values in a New Town: The Politics of Race and Class in Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1981.
Ellefson, C. Ashley. "Free Jupiter and the Rest of the World: the Problem of a Free Negro in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 1-13.
Farquhar, Roger Brooke, III. "Slavery Ebbed Early in Sandy Spring." Legacy 17 (Winter 1997): 1, 7.
Farrar, Hayward. "The Baltimore Afro-American's Crusade Against Racism in Employment, 1892-1950." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1998): 6.
Favor, Homer Eli. The Effects of Racial Changes in Occupancy Patterns upon Property Values in Baltimore. Ph.D. diss., University of Pittsburgh, 1960.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The author explores how free populations in Maryland - both black and white - challenged the notion of a slave society. The free black population, very much interconnected with the slave population in terms of kinship ties, also provided a threat to the underpinnings of the system. Once freedom arrived, social relationships also had to be redefined. The author writes that "free blacks did not occupy a unique or legitimate place within Maryland society, but instead formed an anomalous adjunct to the slave population" (3). By 1840, free blacks in Maryland composed 41% of the total black population of the state, or the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Fuke, Richard Paul. Imperfect Equality: African Americans and the Confines of White Racial Attitudes in Post-Emancipation Maryland. New York: Fordham University Press, 1999.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "Peasant Priorities?: Tidewater Blacks and the Land in Post-Emancipation Maryland." Locus 3 (Fall 1990): 21-45.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "Planters, Apprenticeship, and Forced Labor: The Black Family Under Pressure in Post-Emancipation Maryland." Agricultural History 62 (Fall 1988): 57-74.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "A Reform Mentality: Federal Policy toward Black Marylanders, 1864-1868." Civil War History 22 (September 1976): 214-35.
Groves, Paul A., and Edward K. Muller. "The Evolution of Black Residential Areas in Late Nineteenth-Century Cities." Journal of Historical Geography 1 (April 1975): 169-91.
Annotation / Notes: Includes Baltimore.
Gwillim, Joy. "Slavery in Cecil County." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 68 (September 1994): 5-6.
Holland, Marcella. "Emergence of Maryland's African-American Women Attorneys." Maryland Bar Journal 28 (July 1995): 14-19.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 236-45.