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Cassell, Frank A. Merchant Congressman in the Young Republic: Samuel Smith of Maryland. Madison: The University Press of Wisconsin, 1971.
Annotation / Notes: Samuel Smith epitomizes the history of Baltimore City during the early republic. An officer during the Revolution and the commander of the forces that defended the city against the British attack in 1813, a member of an important merchant family whose economic connections helped him establish a political power base that stretched almost five decades, and sometimes brought him to the brink of economic ruin, he was a major political figure from George Washington's presidency through Andrew Jackson's. His career also reveals the elusiveness of political labels. As a Republican leader in the 1790s, he opposed the policies of the Federalists and supported those of Thomas Jefferson, but he and his brother Robert Smith had a falling out with James Madison, and by the 1830s he was courted by the more democratic Jacksonians who refused to anoint his kin as party leaders.
George, Christopher T. "Sunk to Save Baltimore: Compensating the Owners of Ships Sunk in Baltimore Harbor During the War of 1812." Journal of the War of 1812, 14 (Summer 2011): 10-23.
Sarson, Steven. "'It cannot be expected that I can defend every man's turnip patch': Embargoes, the War of 1812, and Inequality and Poverty in the Chesapeake Region." Revue Francaise d'Etudes Americaines, 139 (2014): 16-29.