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Holland, Marcella. "Emergence of Maryland's African-American Women Attorneys." Maryland Bar Journal 28 (July 1995): 14-19.
Chesser, Helen Brown. "St. George Island Memories." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 98-104.
Annotation / Notes: The memories of a woman who grew up on the Island during the early decades of the twentieth century.
Cook, Eleanor M. V. "Georgetown: Jewel of Montgomery County-Part II." Montgomery County Story 42 (February 1999): 61-76.
Dombrowski, Esther. "The Homefront: Harford County During World War II, Part I." Harford Historical Bulletin 65 (Summer 1995): 107-52; "Part II."Harford Historical Bulletin 66 (Fall 1995): 155-204.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Lime Kiln." Historical Society of Frederick County Journal [3] (Summer 1994): 16-19.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Murphy, Jeanne Payne. "The Letters of Lafayette Buckler from 1859 to 1884." Chronicles of St. Mary's 30 (March 1982): 421-32; (April 1982): 433-44; (May 1982): 445-54.
Annotation / Notes: Transcriptions of a series of 41 letters written by Lafayette to Victoria McGinley Buckler, his wife, as they traveled between their home in St. Mary's and Baltimore. Two letters are also included written by Victoria. The letters deal with the details of daily life and the relationship of this couple. A sizeable introduction proceeds the letters and places the letters in the context of place, time, and family.
Cameron, Mark. "Monuments of Urbanity: The Development of Baltimore's Residential Squares." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1998): 5.
Crook, Mary Charlotte. "Lilly Moore Stone, Founder of the Montgomery County Historical Society." Montgomery County Story 20 (November 1977): 1-10.
Key, Betty McKeever, comp. Oral History in Maryland: A Directory. Edited by Larry E. Sullivan. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1981.
Annotation / Notes: Although it is very outdated, this directory should serve be the starting point for anyone attempting to locate oral history collections relevant to Maryland. Collections surveyed were not only in institutional hands (schools, libraries, and historical agencies) but also belonged to governmental agencies and private individuals. Included are DC and PA collections of potential interest.
Gibb, James G., and Julia A. King. "Gender, Activity Areas, and Homelots in the 17th-Century Chesapeake Region." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 109-131.
Annotation / Notes: Using archaeological records and spatial analysis from three Southern Maryland tobacco plantation sites, the authors provide an ethnographic look at life for seventeenth-century Maryland colonists in terms of gender and class roles. The article provides a brief overview of the economics of the Chesapeake region, the structure of living arrangements, and the gendered nature of tasks. The evidence suggests how gendered and class-based activities contributed to both household production and accrued wealth. The authors conclude that comparisons between the three sites provide the basis for understanding how household wealth was a direct corollary of the ability to secure a large work force and to develop a high degree of specialization.
Barlow, Marjorie Dana, comp. Notes on Woman Printers In Colonial America and the United States 1639-1975. New York: Hroswitha Club, 1976.
Biehl, Katherine L. Economic and Social Conditions among Eighteenth-Century Maryland Women. M.A. Thesis, University of Maryland, 1940.
Cale, Clyde C., Jr. "Biographical Material on Maria Louise Browning." Glades Star 9 (June 1999): 68-69.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "The Planter's Wife: The Experience of White Women in Seventeenth Century Maryland." William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series 34 (October 1977): 542-71.
Annotation / Notes: Most women coming to Maryland in the seventeenth century were indentured servants between ages eighteen and twenty-five. Hard work in the tobacco fields, late marriage, and early death awaited them. However, for the woman who survived seasoning and their period of service, the sexual imbalance let them choose her husband and seize the opportunity to become a planter's wife. She risked childbirth, bore three to four children, and hoped one or two lived to adulthood. Widows remarried quickly, and complex families were the norm.
Glickman, Gena Debra. A Study of the Role of Women in the Transformation of the Curriculum at the Maryland Institute for the Promotion of Mechanic Arts from 1825-1875. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1992.
Gottlieb, Agnes Hooper. "Malloy of the American: Baltimore's Pioneer Woman Journalist." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Spring 1996): 28-46.
Annotation / Notes: Story of Baltimore's first woman journalist. Malloy extended the boundary of the woman's sphere by defining the home as including the city in which women lived. Thus, she focused her writing on municipal reforms, which led to major changes in Baltimore's juvenile justice system and overhauled the city's fire department.
Haag, Pamela Susan. "'Commerce in Souls': Vice, Virtue, and Women's Wage Work in Baltimore, 1900-1915." Maryland Historical Magazine 86 (Fall 1991): 292-308.
Helmes, Winifred G., ed. A History of the Maryland Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., 1929-1980. College Park, MD: The Federation, 1986.
McCreesh, Carolyn. On the Picket Line: Militant Women Campaign to Organize Garment Workers, 1880-1917. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1975.
McDonald, Patricia Ann. Baltimore Women, 1870-1900. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore women in the late nineteenth century bore much responsibility for their own well being. Material conditions for women did not improve significantly, and women increasingly contributed to the family income. Irish women improved their economic condition the most. German and native born women dropped a little, and black women faired poorly due to "occupational immobility" and other factors. Upper middle class reformers fought for improved opportunities and services for less advantaged women.
Olson, Karen Faith. When a Woman Has a Working Life: The Transformation of Gender Relations in a Steelmaking Community. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: Captures the social world of steelworkers' wives in Dundalk, Maryland, through sixty interviews. A planned industrial community from the 1880s, steel dominated life in Dundalk. Male work culture, swing shifts, and high wages served company needs and kept women out of the paid labor force. A decline in steelmaking forced women to "get a working life," which has altered role expectations and gender relations in that community. Class bias and racial divisions are also factors in this transformation.