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Guroff, Margaret. "James Rouse." Baltimore 92 (November 1999): 46-47.
Guroff, Margaret. "Glenn L. Martin." Baltimore 92 (July 1999): 30-31.
Helm, Ruth. 'For Credit, Honor, and Profit': Three Generations of the Peale Family in America. Ph.D. diss., University of Colorado, Boulder, 1991.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "Inventive, Imaginative, and Incorrigible: The Winans Family and the Building of the First Russian Railroad." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 50-56.
Linton, Terry L. "The Forgotten Millwright, Isiah Linton 1739-1775." History Trails 23 (Autumn, 1988-Winter, 1988/1989): 1-7.
Moser, Liz Kohn. "Growing Up in Two Families: My Two Families: Home and Hochschild, Kohn & Co." Generations (Fall 1998): 8-11.
Power, Garrett. "The Carpenter and the Crocodile." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Spring 1996): 4-15.
Price, Jacob M. Perry of London-A Family and a Firm on the Seaborne Frontier, 1615-1753. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992.
Schlesinger, Carl, ed. The Biography of Ottmar Mergenthaler. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Books, 1989.
Schneidereith, C. William, Jr. In Tribute to C. William Schneidereith 1886-1976. Baltimore: Schneidereith & Sons, 1977.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore printer.
Simpson, Howard E. Recollections of a Railroad Career. N.p.: Published by the author, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Memoir of an official of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.
White, Roger. "The Jones Family of Odenton: A Railroading Tradition." Anne Arundel County History Notes 22 (January 1991): 1, 10-13, 16.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. Power and Poverty: Theory and Practice. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Bolster, W. Jeffrey. Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the Age of Sail. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997.
Brackett, Jeffrey Richardson. The Negro in Maryland: A Study of the Institution of Slavery, extra vol. 6. Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 1889.
Bradford, S. Sydney. "The Negro Ironworker in Ante Bellum Virginia." Journal of Southern History 25 (1959): 194-206.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Burkhart, Lynne C. Old Values in a New Town: The Politics of Race and Class in Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1981.
Calderhead, William. "How Extensive Was the Border State Slave Trade? A New Look." Civil War History 18 (1972): 42-55.
Calderhead, William. "The Role of the Professional Slave Trader in a Slave Economy: Austin Woolfolk, A Case Study." Civil War History 23 (September 1977): 195-211.
Callcott, Margaret Law. "Inventory of a Maryland Slave Cabin." Riversdale Letter 12 (Spring 1995): 2-4.
Clemens, Paul G.E. The Atlantic Economy and Colonial Maryland's Eastern Shore: From Tobacco to Grain. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1980.
Daniels, Christine Marie. Alternative Workers in a Slave Economy, Kent County, Maryland, 1675-1810. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1990.