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Hicks, Helena S. The Black Apprentice in Maryland Court Records from 1661 to 1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the apprenticeship system in Maryland as related to blacks during the period 1661 to 1865. For blacks in Maryland, apprenticeship was one of the earliest forms of education available. Court records are used to examine Maryland's apprenticeship system. Although Maryland's apprenticeship law of 1793 eliminated the reading and writing requirement for apprentices in the case of black apprentices, black apprentices' contracts still contained literacy provisions. Employment in various trade was another benefit resulting from the apprenticeship system.
Kulikoff, Allan. "Black Society and the Economics of Slavery." Maryland Historical Magazine 70 (Summer 1975): 203-10.
Annotation / Notes: Review Essay.
Kulikoff, Alan. Tobacco and Slaves: The Development of Southern Cultures in the Chesapeake, 1680-1800. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1986.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. "Slave Families at Early Chesapeake Ironworks." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 86 (April 1978): 169-79.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the self-determination on the part of blacks enslaved as ironworkers in order to counter the view of the fragmented black family as espoused by scholars such as E. Franklin Frazier and Daniel P. Moynihan. The author examines such Maryland ironworks as Northampton Furnace and Patuxent Iron Works. Ironworkers were provided opportunities for "overwork" - that is, working overtime in return for cash or supplies. The money allowed ironworkers and their families an improved standard of living. In addition, ironworkers did not experience strict controls over their free time, home life, or leisure activities. These factors, the author feels, contributed to a stable family structure among enslaved ironworkers.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. Slavery in the Chesapeake Iron Industry, 1716-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Akron, 1974.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. "Slavery on Chesapeake Iron Plantations Before the American Revolution." Journal of Negro History 59 (July 1974): 242-54.
McCusker, John J., and Russell R. Menard. The Economy of British America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Menard, Russell R. "From Servants to Slaves: The Transformation of the Chesapeake Labor System." Southern Studies 16 (Winter 1977): 355-90.
Menard, Russell R. "The Maryland Slave Population, 1658 to 1730: A Demographic Profile of Blacks in Four Counties." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 33 (January 1975): 29-54.
Morgan, Edmund S. American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975.
Morgan, Kenneth. "Slave Sales in Colonial Charleston." English Historical Review 113 (September 1998): 905-27.
Murphy, Thomas Richard. 'Negroes of Ours:' Jesuit Slaveholding in Maryland, 1717-1838. Ph.D. diss., University of Connecticut, 1998.
Nevile, Barry, and Edward Jones. "Slavery in Worcester County, Maryland, 1688-1766." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 319-27.
Annotation / Notes: The authors examine slavery in Worcester County, Maryland, before the American Revolution, in order to paint a different picture of slavery than that which is portrayed in popular culture, the large, gang-labor-based institution of the cotton South. Ultimately, the authors set out to identify changing patterns of slaveholding in the county before the Revolution. The increase in the use of slaves corresponded with the decline in the use of indentured servants.
Phillips, Christopher William. 'Negroes and Other Slaves:' The African-American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1992.
Phillips, Christopher. "The Roots of Quasi-Freedom: Manumission and Term Slavery in Early National Baltimore." Southern Studies 4 (Spring 1993): 39-66.
Sharrer, George Terry. Slaveholding in Maryland, 1695-1775. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1968.
Sutherland, Hunter. "Slavery in Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 35 (Winter 1988): 19-27.
Sweig, Donald M. "The Importation of African Slaves to the Potomac River, 1732- 1772." William and Mary Quarterly 42 (October 1985): 507-524.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Rural African Americans in the Constitutional Era in Maryland, 1776-1810." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 327-41.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the changing working conditions and differing experiences of slaves on six Maryland plantations during the Constitutional Era. Tasks varied by plantation, as did the family life of the enslaved population. The author uses correspondence and plantation records to attempt to reconstruct the daily lives of the enslaved on these plantations.
Wax, Darold D. "Black Immigrants: The Slave Trade in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (March 1978): 30-45.
Marzio, Peter. "Carpentry in the Southern Colonies during the Eighteenth Century with Emphasis on Maryland and Virginia." Winterthur Portfolio 7 (1972): 229-250.
Anderton, Esther. "Application for Distillers' Licenses 1798-1801." Anne Arundel Speaks 4 (September 1978): 4-5; (December 1978): 3-4.
Barnett, Todd H. "Tobacco, Planters, Tenants, and Slaves: A Portrait of Montgomery County in 1783." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Summer 1994): 184-203.
Annotation / Notes: Using the Maryland State Assessment of 1783, this study evaluates the condition of the Montgomery County community. Montgomery was the western most of Maryland's tobacco counties. This economy left Montgomery with exhausted farmland, as well as a poor, landless, and unstable population. Comparison is made with Frederick where the soil was essentially the same but had not been damaged by tobacco farming.
Boyd, Thomas Hulings Stockton. The History of Montgomery County, Maryland, from its earliest settlement in 1650 to 1879. Clarksburgh, MD [Baltimore, W. K. Boyle & son, printers], 1879; reprint, Baltimore: Regional Pub. Co, 1968.
Annotation / Notes: Written following the American, and the County's, Centennial, this work places special emphasis on land grants and prominent men. Includes a directory of the towns, villages, and residents.