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Fletcher, Charlotte. "John McDowell, Federalist: President of St. John's College." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 242-51.
Middleton, Arthur Pierce. "William Smith: Godfather and First President of St. John's College." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 235-41.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Fletcher, William Joseph. The Contribution of the Faculty of Saint Mary's Seminary to the Solution of Baltimore's San Domingan Negro Problems, 1793-1852. M.A. thesis, The Johns Hopkins University, 1951.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Sabillasville." Frederick Magazine (July 1990): 11-12.
Garrigus, Carl E., Jr. "The Reading Habits of Maryland's Planter Gentry, 1718-1747." Maryland Historical Magazine 92 (Spring 1997): 36-53.
Annotation / Notes: Studies of reading habits have enjoyed a renaissance in recent years, and this article builds on pioneering research in the 1930s of Joseph Towne Wheeler in analyzing the contents of colonial Maryland bookshelves. The change in reading preferences that occurred in the later eighteenth century brought much greater diversity to personal libraries that formerly were dominated by devotional, legal and classical titles. There also is evidence that reading before 1750 was more intensive, that is, readers tended to return to the same text or passage for repeated readings. This, coupled with the expense of purchasing and importing books, helps explain the relative paucity of published works owned by the literate elite in colonial Maryland.
Fisher, James Long. The Origin and Development of Public School Music in Baltimore to 1870. Ed.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1970.
Heintze, James R. "Alexander Malcolm: Musician, Clergyman, and Schoolmaster." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 226-35.
Brown, Anne W. "The Phoenix: a History of the St. John's College Library." Maryland Historical Magazine 65 (1970): 413-429.
Cox, Richard J. The Origins of Archival Development in Maryland, 1634-1934. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Cox presents the development of what he argued were Maryland's three most important archival institutions -- the Maryland Historical Society, the Maryland State Archives, and the Baltimore City Archives. Some discussion is also given to the development of the history profession in Maryland.
Faust, Page T. "Keeping History Alive at Sotterly Plantation." Chronicles of St. Mary's 46 (Winter 1998): 338-39.
Kalisch, Philip A. The Social History of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Ed.D. diss., The Pennsylvania State University, 1967.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore businessmen, Enoch Pratt, had a goal to establish a free reading library that people could use it to acquire education and make themselves financial successful. Although the first two directors of this library were only moderately successful, they were responsible for laying the groundwork for a strong liberal arts collection, however, there was little outreach into the community. After 1926, the Pratt's directors guided the library to become a leading public library system, known for innovation, and for professional education. The author emphasizes the social objectives of the library and how the Pratt fits into the cultural world of Baltimore.
Davis, Richard Beale. Intellectual Life in the Colonial South 1585-1763, 3 vols. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Davis's three-volume work surveys the "nature and development of the southern mind" during the colonial period and seeks to counter the standard interpretation of the predominant role of colonial New England in shaping the intellectual life of what would become the new nation. Topics include education, libraries and printing, religious writings, fine arts, literature, and public oratory. The volumes draw extensively on manuscript collections, some only recently discovered, in Britain and the United States, including important Maryland archives; chapters are followed by extensive bibliographies and notes.
Johansen, Mary Carroll. 'Female Instruction and Improvement': Education for Women in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, 1785-1835. Ph.D. diss., College of William and Mary, 1996.
Yewell, Therese C. Women of Achievement in Prince George's County History. Upper Marlboro, MD: Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Prince George's County Planning Board, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: This is a model of how to present biographical portraits. The biographies of these Prince George's County women are arranged in chronological order. Each chapter begins with an historical narrative that places the biographies in context.
Corner, George W. "Apprenticed to Aesculapius. The American Medical Student, 1765-1965." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 109 (1965): 249-258.
Fletcher, Charlotte. "King William's School and the College of William and Mary." Maryland Historical Magazine 78 (1983): 118-128.
Nybakken, Elizabeth. "In the Irish Tradition: Pre-revolutionary Academies in America." History of Education Quarterly 37 (1997):163-183.
Pilcher, George William. "Samuel Davies and the Instruction of Negroes in Virginia." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 74 (1966): 293-300.
Putney, Martha S. "Nelson Wells and His Legacy." Negro History Bulletin 39 (1976): 642-647.
Smith, Philip Kingsley. "The Consequences of Thomas Bray's 1700 Visit to Maryland: Expected and Unexpected." Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society,44 (no. 1, 2002): 27-33.
Ryan, Maura Margaret. The Americanization of Immigrant Children by Public and Parochial Schools in Baltimore, 1897-1917. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1993.