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Adams, Sandra Ludwig. "The Legacy of Elisha Tyson, Venerable Citizen." Maryland Magazine 14 (Autumn 1981): 22-25.
De Pasquale, Sue. "Merchant with a Plan and a Vision." Johns Hopkins Magazine 41 (June 1989): 36-37.
Annotation / Notes: Johns Hopkins.
Futrell, Roger H. "Zachariah Riney: Lincoln's First Schoolmaster." Lincoln Herald 74 (1972): 136-142.
Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. The Power and Passion of M. Carey Thomas. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
Jacob, Kathryn A. "Mr. Johns Hopkins." Johns Hopkins Magazine 25 (January 1974): 13-17.
Johnston, Sona K. "Friendship and Patronage: A Nineteenth-Century Tradition." Maryland Humanities (March/April 1994): 10-12.
Kellman, Naomi. "Dr. Samson Benderly." Generations 4 (December 1983): 25-31.
McClain, William H. "William Kurrelmeyer: German-American 1874-1957." Report of the Society for the History of the Germans in Maryland 37 (1978): 8-18.
Annotation / Notes: Biographical sketch of German professor at Johns Hopkins University.
Middleton, Arthur Pierce. "William Smith: Godfather and First President of St. John's College." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 235-41.
Omerod, Dana Evans. Robert E. Lee: President of Washington College, 1865-1870. Ph.D. diss., Kent State University, 1993.
Parker, Franklin. George Peabody: A Biography. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 1971; revised edition, 1995.
Rothberg, Morey. "Historic Beginnings." Johns Hopkins Magazine 48 (June 1996): 53-60.
Schaaf, Elizabeth. "George Peabody: His Life and Legacy, 1795-1869." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Fall 1995): 268-85.
Annotation / Notes: George Peabody's legacy to Baltimore transcends the music conservatory and magnificent library that bear his name. His gifts influenced other wealthy friends whose philanthropy help establish some of the great educational and cultural institutions that grace the city: the Johns Hopkins University, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the Walters Art Gallery. This article surveys the life of a man admired and respected on both sides of the Atlantic.
Shaw, Richard. John Dubois, Founding Father: The Life and Times of the Founder of Mount St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg. Emmitsburg, MD: Mount St. Mary's College, 1983.
Banks, Theresa Douglas. The Development of Public Education for the Negro in Prince George's County (1872-1946). M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1948.
Clarke, Nina Honemond. History of the Nineteenth-Century Black Churches in Maryland and Washington, D.C. New York: Vantage Press, 1983.
Clarke, Nina H., and Lillian B. Brown. History of the Black Public Schools of Montgomery County, Maryland 1872-1961. New York: Vantage Press, 1978.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Fletcher, William Joseph. The Contribution of the Faculty of Saint Mary's Seminary to the Solution of Baltimore's San Domingan Negro Problems, 1793-1852. M.A. thesis, The Johns Hopkins University, 1951.
Foner, Philip S. "Address of Frederick Douglass at the Inauguration of Douglass Institute, Baltimore, October 1, 1865." Journal of Negro History 54 (1969): 174-183.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "The Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People, 1864-1870." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 369-404.
Annotation / Notes: In 1864, Baltimore businessmen, lawyers and clergymen formed the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People. Many of these men had been associated with emancipation causes. These men coordinated the flow of money and supplies provided by the Freedmen's Bureau. Eventually, the schools founded by the Association were taken over by the state, which had initially not provided for free, public Negro education at all.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "A Reform Mentality: Federal Policy toward Black Marylanders, 1864-1868." Civil War History 22 (September 1976): 214-35.
Gardner, Bettye. "Ante-bellum Black Education in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Fall 1976): 360-66.
Annotation / Notes: Just before the Civil War, Baltimore had the largest free black population of any city in the country. Most antebellum education of free blacks was provided by the numerous black churches and concerned black and white citizens. Still, free blacks were taxed even though no free public educational facilities were provided for their children. Sunday (Sabbath) schools provided much of the schooling available to free blacks, although a few days schools existed as well, most notably the African School, founded in 1812. By 1859, there were fifteen schools for blacks in Baltimore, all of which were self-supporting, receiving no local or state funding.
Gerdes, M. Reginald. "To Educate and Evangelize: Black Catholic Schools of the Oblate Sisters of Providence (1828-1880)." U.S. Catholic Historian 7, nos. 2-3 (1988): 183-99.