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Bidwell, Percy W., and John I. Falconer. History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1860. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution, 1925.
Annotation / Notes: Mentions Maryland only regarding farming in 1840 and peach orchards, but is useful since so many Pennsylvania Germans settled in Frederick County.
Breen, T. H. Tobacco Culture: The Mentality of the Great Tidewater Planters on the Eve of the Revolution. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985.
Carr, Lois Green, Russell R. Menard, and Lorena S. Walsh. Robert Cole's World: Agriculture and Society in Early Maryland. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1991.
Clifton, Ronald Dillard. Forms and Patterns: Room Specialization in Maryland, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania Family Dwellings, 1725-1834. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1971.
Craven, Avery O. Soil Exhaustion as a Factor in the Agricultural History of Virginia and Maryland, 1606-1860. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1925.
Daniels, Christine. "'Getting his [or her] Livelyhood:' Free Workers in a Slave Anglo-America, 1675-1810." Agricultural History 71 (Spring 1997): 125-61.
Annotation / Notes: Compared to slaves and servants, free, white laborers, like Nathaniel Dunnahoe in Kent County, in 1716, have been overlooked. However, Daniels found evidence of both the work they did wheat threshing, shingle and plank making, providing firewood, washing, knitting, and midwifery, among other things and the wages they earned. "Free male and female laborers in the slave Chesapeake found work at tasks either unrelated or only indirectly related to the plantation staple." (p. 157). Economic niches, apparently, existed early on.
Gagliardo, John G. "Germans and Agriculture in Colonial Pennsylvania." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 83 (1959): 192-218.
Gray, Lewis C. History of Agriculture in the Southern United States to 1860. 2 vols. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution, 1933.
Annotation / Notes: From barley to wool, Gray's great work is unsurpassed in its detail about farming from Maryland's founding to the Civil War.
MacMaster, Richard K. "Sidelights: Instructions to a Tobacco Factor, 1725." Maryland Historical Magazine 63 (1968): 172-178.
Main, Gloria L. Tobacco Colony: Life in Early Maryland, 1650-1720. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982.
Menard, Russell R. "Farm Prices of Maryland Tobacco, 1659-1710." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 80-85.
Middleton, Authur Pierce. Tobacco Coast: A Maritime History of the Chesapeake Bay in the Colonial Era. Newport News, VA: Mariners Museum, 1953.
Percy, David O. "Ax or Plow? Significant Colonial Landscape Alteration Rates in the Maryland and Virginia Tidewater." Agricultural History 66 (Spring 1992): 66-74.
Annotation / Notes: Soil exhaustion figured in colonial Maryland's decline, but it was wheat rather than tobacco that did the most damage. "While the ax created an unkempt appearance to the colonial landscape, it was the unwise use of the plow that eventually damaged the soil." (p. 74).
Sarudy, Barbara Wells. "Eighteenth-Century Gardens of the Chesapeake." A special issue of the Journal of Garden History: An International Quarterly 9 (July-Sept. 1989): 103-59.
Trimble, Logan C. "Middling Planters and the Strategy of Diversification in Baltimore County, Maryland, 1750-1776." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (Summer 1990): 171-78.
Walsh, Jim. "Barrels for a 'Middling Planter' in Colonial Prince George's County." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 25 (August/September 1997): 2-4.
Wiser, Vivian. The Movement for Agricultural Improvement in Maryland, 1785-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1963.
Wyckoff, Vetrees J. Tobacco Regulation in Colonial Maryland. Johns Hopkins University Studies. Extra vol., n.s., no. 22 (1936).
LeoGrande, William M. "'No Gain': Portrait of a Family Farm." Montgomery County Story 42 (May 1999): 77-88.
Clemens, Paul G.E. The Atlantic Economy and Colonial Maryland's Eastern Shore: From Tobacco to Grain. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1980.
Kulikoff, Alan. Tobacco and Slaves: The Development of Southern Cultures in the Chesapeake, 1680-1800. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1986.
Barnett, Todd H. "Tobacco, Planters, Tenants, and Slaves: A Portrait of Montgomery County in 1783." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Summer 1994): 184-203.
Annotation / Notes: Using the Maryland State Assessment of 1783, this study evaluates the condition of the Montgomery County community. Montgomery was the western most of Maryland's tobacco counties. This economy left Montgomery with exhausted farmland, as well as a poor, landless, and unstable population. Comparison is made with Frederick where the soil was essentially the same but had not been damaged by tobacco farming.
Browne, Gary L. "Milling, Mining and Milking: The Evolution of Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 48 (Spring 1991): 46-54.
Clawson, Frank D. "Hagerstown and Frederick Described: What it Was Like Here in the 1700s." Cracker Barrel 18 (August 1988): 29-30.
Marks, Bayly Ellen. "The Tax Assessor's Portrait of a County." History Trails 30 (Autumn-Winter 1995-1996): 1-5.
Annotation / Notes: A study of Baltimore County structures in eight of the County's twelve hundreds, using information gleaned from the 1798 tax assessment. The assessment provides an inventory of structures with exact measurements. Through this early government document it is possible to deduce how people lived.