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Power, Garrett. Parceling Out Land in Baltimore, 1632-1796. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Reprints of two Maryland Historical Magazine articles with the same title. Using a variety of sources, both primary and secondary, Power traces the chain of title, up to the point of incorporation, of the 2000 acres of Baltimore Town, Jones Town, and Fell's Point, the communities that became Baltimore City.
Power, Garrett. "Entail in Two Cities: A Comparative Study of Long Term Leases in Birmingham, England and Baltimore, Maryland, 1700-1900." Journal of Architectural and Planning Research 9 (Winter 1994): 315-24.
Power, Garrett. "Parceling out Land in the Vicinity of Baltimore: 1632-1796, Part 1." Maryland Historical Magazine 87 (Winter 1992): 453-466.
Power, Garrett. "Parceling out Land in the Vicinity of Baltimore: 1632-1796, Part 2." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Summer 1993): 150-80.
Power, Garrett. "Prose from a Farm Ledger." History Trails 11 (Autumn 1976): 1-6.
Annotation / Notes: Charles Jessop (1759-1828).
Rice, James D. "Old Appalachia's Path to Interdependency: Economic Development and the Creation of Community in Western Maryland, 1730-1850." Appalachian Journal 22 (no. 4, 1996): 348-74.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Robinson, John M. "History of Pinehurst-Part I." Anne Arundel County History Notes 21 (January 1990): 3-4.
Robinson, Ophelia McKay. "Richard McKay of Maryland and Kentucky." Chronicles of St. Mary's 30 (June 1982): 457-63.
Russo, Jean Elliott. 'The Interest of the County': Population, Economy, and Society in Eighteenth-Century Somerset County, Maryland. Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1999.
Russo, Jean B. "The Early Towns of Montgomery County, 1747-1831." Montgomery County Story 34 (May 1991): 153-64.
Annotation / Notes: Montgomery County towns developed slow and were crossroad communities that served the County's agricultural community. The early towns were scattered across the county. They were not focussed on the southern boundary line as was common during the late twentieth century. Rockville, the county seat, remained in the shadow of the more cosmopolitan Georgetown into the mid-19th century.
Sarson, Steven James. Wealth, Poverty and Labor in the Tobacco Plantation South: Prince George's County, Maryland, in the Early National Era. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1998.
Schildknecht, Calvin E. "Fredericktown in 1782 from the Diary of a German Prisoner." Historical Society of Frederick County, Inc., Newsletter (November 1990): 4-5.
Schoch, Mildred C., comp. The Endeavours & Exertions of Queen Anne's County, Maryland During the Revolutionary War 1775-1783. N.p.: [Queen Anne's County Bicentennial Commission, 1976].
Shomette, Donald. London Town: A Brief History. Londontown, MD: London Town Public House Commission, Inc., 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Londontown, located on the South River, was a very early example of successful town planning in Maryland. The community, however, did not have any long term success due to its economic base in the tobacco system.
Shomette, Donald. A Star Spangled Year 1748-1998: Frederick County 250th Anniversary Commemorative. [Frederick, MD]: Diversions Publications, 1997.
Steffen, Charles G. From Gentlemen to Townsmen: The Gentry of Baltimore County, Maryland, 1660-1776. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1993.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. Settlement, Community, and Economy: The Development of Towns in Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, 1660-1775. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Thomas argues that the seventeen clustered settlements that dotted the lower Eastern Shore actually functioned as towns. Although legislatively established they have been largely ignored in the history of the Chesapeake region. Most historians argue that the area was rural, when in fact its character was between urban and rural.
Tracey, Grace L., and John P. Dern. Pioneers of Old Monocacy: The Early Settlement of Frederick County, Maryland, 1721-1743. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987.
Annotation / Notes: A history of that portion of Prince George's County that in 1748 became Frederick County as told through the stories of the original land patents and their owners. The appendix includes many handy lists including a list of 1733-1734 inhabitants, early German Settlers, and Frederick County Muster Rolls, ca. 1757.
Tyson, John S. The Founders of Ellicott's Mills. Privately printed, sold for the benefit of the Maryland Historical Society, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: A series of articles originally published in 1847 in the Howard District Press.
Walton, John M., Jr. "Prince George's Genesis." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 20 (August 1992): 3-4.
Walton, John M., Jr. "Washington's 1784 Visit to this Section." Glades Star 7 (December 1995): 634-37, 651.
Walton, John M., Jr. "Washington's Views of Kent County." Old Kent 12 (Spring 1995): 1-2.
Weeks, Christopher. "Bouncing Along the Post Road: Eighteenth Century Harford County as Seen by Travelers." Harford Historical Bulletin 57 (Summer 1993): 74-127.
Annotation / Notes: Annotated excerpts from ten contemporary descriptions of traveling along the post road. The authors include such well known Colonial figures as Dr. Alexander Hamilton, Charles Willson Peale, and Benjamin Henry Latrobe.