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Carmichael, Edmund C. The Pacas of Maryland and Their "Relatives." [Belhaven, NC]: E. C. Paca, 1994.
Fenwick, LaVerne M. "The Hebbs of St. Mary's County, Maryland." Chronicles of St. Mary's 39 (Spring 1991): 1-15.
Fenwick, LaVerne M. "James Drane History." Glades Star 7 (March 1995): 527-29, 536.
National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Maryland. Adventurers, Cavaliers, Patriots: Ancestors Remembered. Leonardtown, MD: St. Mary's County Historical Society, 1994.
Small, Clara Louise. Three Generations of the Ennis Family: A Demographic Study on the Lower Eastern Shore. Ph.D. diss., University of Delaware, 1990.
Sparrow, Margaret W. "The Sparrows of Sparrow's Point." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (Winter 1990): 395-403.
Arpee, Marion. "Maryland Slaves in Hardey Wills and Indentures: 1718-1805." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 22 (Winter 1981): 24-27.
Callum, Agnes Kane. "Free Blacks of St. Mary's County, Maryland - 1800." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 22 (Spring 1981): 144-46.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Davidson, Thomas E. "Free Blacks in Old Somerset County, 1745-1755." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 151-156.
Annotation / Notes: County court records of Somerset County, Maryland during the eighteenth century are particularly complete, allowing for detailed studies of the county's population during that period. The author contributes to the scholarship which, up until 1985, focused primarily on the origins of black culture on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in the seventeenth century. The author also adds to the growing scholarship on free blacks in this region, which tended to also focus on the seventeenth century. In addition to examining court records to determine the numbers of free Negroes and mulattoes, the author also attempts to determine how members of these populations obtained their free status, that is, through manumission or the as the result of being children of free mothers (free-born).
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Floyd, Bianca. Records and Recollections: Early Black History in Prince George's County. Bladensburg, MD: Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, 1989.
Harris, Richard E. "Blacks of Maryland's Caroline County Thrive Throughout the Slavery Period." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 8 (Winter 1987): 157-60.
Heinegg, Paul. Free African Americans of Maryland and Delaware: From the Colonial Period to 1810. Baltimore: Clearfield, 2000.
Hurry, Robert J. "An Archeological and Historical Perspective on Benjamin Banneker." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 361-69.
Annotation / Notes: The author provides a survey of the Banneker family farm in southwestern Baltimore County. While most scholarship has focused on Benjamin Banneker's career and achievements as a mathematician, surveyor and astronomer, since the 1970s, scholarship and public funding have helped to illuminate his life as a land-owning farmer. The Bannekers were one of the first African-American families to own land in the Piedmont region of Maryland; Benjamin's father, Robert purchased one hundred acres in 1737.
Klingelhofer, Eric. "Aspects of Early African-American Material Culture: Artifacts from the Slave Quarters at Garrison Plantation, Maryland." Historical Archaeology 21 (1987): 112-19.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the objects excavated from the slave quarters at Garrison Plantation near Baltimore, Maryland. Various groups of objects represented early black material culture which reveal aspects of Africanisms. Archaeology is particularly useful for the study of Africanisms found in material culture as patterns of found objects may be compared chronologically and geographically.
Thornton, Alvin. Like a Phoenix I'll Rise: An Illustrated History of African Americans in Prince George's County, Maryland, 1696-1996. Virginia Beach, VA: Donning Company, 1997.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Rural African Americans in the Constitutional Era in Maryland, 1776-1810." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 327-41.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the changing working conditions and differing experiences of slaves on six Maryland plantations during the Constitutional Era. Tasks varied by plantation, as did the family life of the enslaved population. The author uses correspondence and plantation records to attempt to reconstruct the daily lives of the enslaved on these plantations.
Windley, Lathan A., comp. Runaway Slave Advertisements: A Documentary History from the 1730s to 1790. 4 vols. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1983.
Wright, James M. The Free Negro in Maryland, 1634-1860. Vol. 917, no. 3. Columbia University Studies in History. New York: Columbia University, 1921.
Bayley, Ned. "Colesville-In the Beginning." Montgomery County Story 36 (February 1993): 237-48.
Boyd, Thomas Hulings Stockton. The History of Montgomery County, Maryland, from its earliest settlement in 1650 to 1879. Clarksburgh, MD [Baltimore, W. K. Boyle & son, printers], 1879; reprint, Baltimore: Regional Pub. Co, 1968.
Annotation / Notes: Written following the American, and the County's, Centennial, this work places special emphasis on land grants and prominent men. Includes a directory of the towns, villages, and residents.
Frank, Beryl. "Dr. James Smith-Land Owner in Pikesville." History Trails 15 (Spring 1981): 9-10.
Hutchinson, William E. "The Johnson Family Enterprises Near Sugarloaf Mountain." Historical Society of Frederick County Journal 4 (Spring 1995): 1-15.
Johnston, George. History of Cecil County, Maryland. Elkton: Published by the author. 1881.