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Steiner, Bernard Christian. Life and administration of Sir Robert Eden. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1898; reprint. New York: Johnson Reprint Corp., 1973.
Barnett, Todd Harold. The Evolution of 'North' and 'South:' Settlement and Slavery on America's Sectional Border, 1650-1810. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1993.
Ellefson, C. Ashley. "Free Jupiter and the Rest of the World: the Problem of a Free Negro in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 1-13.
Farquhar, Roger Brooke, III. "Slavery Ebbed Early in Sandy Spring." Legacy 17 (Winter 1997): 1, 7.
Fowler, David Henry. Northern Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage; A Study of Legislation and Public Opinion in the Middle Atlantic States and the States of the Old Northwest. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1963.
Fowler, David Henry. "Freedom Fettered - Blacks and the Constitutional Era in Maryland 1776-1810." Maryland Pendulum (Special Issue 1987): 1-12.
Annotation / Notes: Summaries of papers presented at a conference at Morgan State University, October 1987.
Hall, Robert L. "Slave Resistance in Baltimore City and County, 1747-1790." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 305-18.
Jordan, Winthrop. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Morgan, Edmund S. American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975.
Phillips, Christopher. "The Roots of Quasi-Freedom: Manumission and Term Slavery in Early National Baltimore." Southern Studies 4 (Spring 1993): 39-66.
Quarles, Benjamin. "'Freedom Fettered:' Blacks in the Constitutional Era in Maryland, 1776-1810 - An Introduction." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 299-304.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines how blacks in Maryland fared during the Constitutional Era, a period when questions of race and color, slavery and freedom, were being raised. For the free black population, there was the question of their status. After the Revolution, Maryland's slave and free black populations became more politically aware of the implications of living in a time of such change. The slogans of freedom and equality used during the Revolution were drawn upon by Maryland's black population in order to attempt to effect change.
Saville, Julie. "Rites and Power: Reflections on Slavery, Freedom and Political Ritual." Slavery and Abolition [Great Britain] 20 (April 1999): 81-102.
Sharrer, George Terry. Slaveholding in Maryland, 1695-1775. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1968.
Walsh, Lorena S. Charles County, Maryland, 1658-1705: A Study of Chesapeake Social and Political Structure. Ph.D. diss., Michigan State University, 1977.
Wicek, William M. "The Statutory Law of Slavery and Race in the Thirteen Mainland Colonies of British America." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 34 (1977): 258-80.
Cook, Margaret W. "Early Towns in Calvert County." Calvert County Historical Society News and Notes 2 (April 1983): 12-13.
Marks, Bayly Ellen. "The Tax Assessor's Portrait of a County." History Trails 30 (Autumn-Winter 1995-1996): 1-5.
Annotation / Notes: A study of Baltimore County structures in eight of the County's twelve hundreds, using information gleaned from the 1798 tax assessment. The assessment provides an inventory of structures with exact measurements. Through this early government document it is possible to deduce how people lived.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. Settlement, Community, and Economy: The Development of Towns in Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, 1660-1775. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Thomas argues that the seventeen clustered settlements that dotted the lower Eastern Shore actually functioned as towns. Although legislatively established they have been largely ignored in the history of the Chesapeake region. Most historians argue that the area was rural, when in fact its character was between urban and rural.
Walton, John M., Jr. "Prince George's Genesis." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 20 (August 1992): 3-4.
Capper, John, Garrett Power, and Frank Shivers. Chesapeake Waters: Pollution, Public Health and Public Opinion, 1602-1972. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1983.
Davidson, Steven G., Jay. G. Merwin, Jr., John Capper, Garrett Power, and Frank Shivers, Jr. Chesapeake Waters: Four Centuries of Controversy, Concern and Legislation. 1983; reprint, Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: Primarily on the political process paralleling environmental change but containing many references to contemporary conditions and problems.
Breslaw, Elaine G. "Wit, Whimsy, and Politics: The Uses of Satire by the Tuesday Club of Annapolis, 1744 to 1756." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d series, 32 (April 1975): 295-306.
Annotation / Notes: An introduction to the group of Annapolis wits whose humorous proceedings have survived in a manuscript at the Johns Hopkins University. The antics of the Tuesday Club open a window on the climate of civil discourse that characterized the Golden Era in Annapolis. In contrast to the political tensions that would soon led to revolution, club members employed parodies to mock political conventions. The actual minutes of the club as edited by Professor Breslaw have been published as the Records of the Tuesday Club, 1745 - 1756.